Can Chickens Eat Grapes?

Can Chickens Eat Grapes?

You might wonder if baby chicks can eat grapes.

 

I’ve had many chickens, and with my chicks, I love feeding them treats. Over the years, I’ve gotten a number of questions about what to feed backyard chickens, as well as queries about what treats are safe for baby chicks.

 

 

A common question I get regarding treats is “Can my chicks eat grapes?” We talked about a number of things that they can eat in another video, but I specifically wanted to talk about grapes because it seems to be a very common question now.

 

Before we talk about grapes, just remember that you really want to limit treats to 10% of your chicks’ diet, at most. You want them eating that high-protein chick starter that will give them all the nutrients that they need to grow. But – if you’re like me – you’re gonna want to give treats. 

 

In this article, I’ll answer that question, as well as provide ways to safely feed grapes to baby chicks (and what to avoid).

 

Main takeaways:

  • Yes, chickens can eat grapes
  • It’s best to cut the grapes up so they’re tiny or smash them
  • Stay away from preserves, jams, jellies, or any grapes with added sugar

 

Other reading:

What do chickens eat?

Can chicks eat strawberries?

Can Chicks Eat Grapes?

Yes, your chicks can eat grapes. Always make sure the grapes are fresh – never feed rotten food to your chicks. You only want to feed them very fresh grapes.

How to Feed Grapes

To reduce the chances of choking or impacted crop, always crush the grapes. You don’t want them getting chunks of grapes or any other fruits stuck in their throats, because that can cause the chicks to choke. 

 

Similarly, you also don’t want these humongous chunks of fruit in their crop, because can lead to impacted crop and other digestive issues.

 

I try to crush them really, really well. If you don’t want to crush them, you can chop them, but crushing them doesn’t take that much effort. You put them in a bag and take a rolling pin or a can and just roll it.

 

There’s really no reason that they can’t eat it other than just the size, so as long as the grapes are crushed, mushy, fresh, not rotten in any way, your baby chicks can definitely enjoy them. 

 

Steer Clear of Jellies, Jams, & Preserves

Fresh grapes and grape jelly are not the same thing in terms of the nutritional value for your chicks. 

 

Fresh grapes have a lot of vital nutrients and vitamins. Grape jelly, on the other hand, likely has a lot of sugar in it, so it’s best avoided.

 

Your chicks don’t need sugar, and they certainly don’t need the preservatives and feed additives in commercial grape jellies. Fresh is always best!

 

So yes, chicks can eat grapes. Just be sure to follow the guidelines in this article!

 

Chicken Feed 101 For New Owners

Chicken Feed 101 For New Owners

Healthy hens and roosters don’t come in baskets from storks. It takes the right kind of chicken feed to turn them into active clucking fluffy butts in your coop.

 

What is chicken feed called?

There are several types of chicken feeds. Starter feed is a protein dense variety of chicken feed designed to meet the dietary requirements of baby chicks. To complicate matters, there are varieties of chicken food known as starter/grower feed, which is essentially a type of feed that chickens can eat from 1-20 weeks of age.

 

Generally, chickens are to be fed depending on their growth development stage. 

 

For baby chicks a day old to 10 weeks starter feed should be crumbles or mash that contain 18% protein. Don’t be confused with crumbles and mash. Crumbles look like tiny pieces of granola while mash are finely ground chicken feed pellets. Both are easier to be consumed by chicks compared to huge pellets.

 

Eventually, they’ll start laying. Chicken layer feed would be similar to the textured mixture of crumbles, mash, and pellets. However, It needs at least 16% protein minimum, with added calcium. Layers need high protein chicken feed as well for more eggs. You also need to stay away from feeding onions, and other strong tasting foods to layers. They cause and undesirable taste to the eggs.

 

What do you feed chickens for tasting the best eggs?

We try different types of chicken feeds, but we feed them high quality layer feed and supplement it with our very own blend of natural herbs, oyster shells, garlic for immune boosting, and apple cider vinegar granules to balance gut pH and introduce beneficial bacteria. You can check it out here.

 

What do you feed a chicken?

The basis of any good chicken diet is a high quality poultry feed. We feed our girls a layer mash, which provides them with the right amount of protein and minerals to keep them laying eggs! In short, you can feed chickens:

  1. Layer pellets (16% protein)
  2. Dried insects like black soldier fly larvae or mealworms
  3. Vegetables (here’s a list of vegetables you can feed chickens)
  4. Fruits such as grapes, berries, and melons
  5. Grasses
  6. Seeds like wheat or millet

 

What is the best feed for chickens?

The best feed is high in protein, while providing all the nutrients chickens need. While there are a lot of commercial chicken feeds on the market, I still prefer non-GMO chicken feed. We’re proud to have the best chicken feed that can even give chickens fluffy feathers and produce the best eggs! Click here to know where to get chicken feed.

 

If you want to make your own homemade feed, just make sure it has essential chicken feed ingredients. You can read my favorite chicken feed recipe here.

 

How much do you feed a chicken per day?

A well known ballpark figure for estimating purpose is 1/4 pound of feed per chicken per day, or, 1.5 pounds of feed per chicken per week. Keep in mind that this is a ballpark figure, and you’ll need to watch your flock’s intake. If they gobble their feed quickly, and still seem hungry, offer more.

 

Do free range chickens need feed?

Yes. Even though they have access to pasture, you still need to give them poultry chicken feed to make sure they’re getting the right kind and enough nutrition.

 

Do chickens need food and water at night?

Chickens roost and sleep at night, and they won’t get up to eat and drink until it’s light again. However, you should always provide 24 hour access to water. Here’s a list of waterers we recommend.

 

How often should chickens be fed?

How often do you feed chickens is a very common question in growing backyard chickens. Food must be available to chickens whenever they need it. The full feeding method is a good technique to guarantee that there is constant supply of feed at all times. You can also use automatic feeders like these. We’ve also reviewed Duncan Feeder’s automatic feeders here.

 

How much food does a chicken need per day?

¼ cup of a high quality chicken feed. Best to offer free choice all day.

 

Can you overfeed chickens?

Everything must be taken in moderation. Overfeeding chicken is possible and they become obese especially if they’re confined to the coop. Free range hens however get enough exercise and are unlikely to be obese.

 

Do free range chickens need scratch? 

No. They don’t. Unless it’s winter and the ground is covered in snow.

 

Then there’s also grit. Grit is not feed, it’s rocks. Chickens need grit to help digest their feed. It’s their equivalent to teeth. Free fed chicken will find their way to grit in the form of tiny bits of stone and gravel but it would be helpful if you threw some in the coop or their feed too. 

 

Grit comes as flint and oyster shell. Oyster shell is soluble and it provides calcium which would be much used by layers in particular. It’s just like feeding chickens with eggshells.

 

What should you not feed chickens? What foods are poisonous to chickens?

While looking for alternative chicken feed, you might have considered beans. Although they look like something chickens would eat, dried and raw beans are a no-no. It contains phytohaemagglutinin which is fatal to chickens. Moldy fruits and vegetables aren’t good as Fowl feed too.

 

Caffeine is also toxic to chickens. Giving them a few pecks of chocolates would not cause too much harm but remember, chocolates are known to cause cardiac arrest in birds!

 

Other foods that are not good for chicken are:

  1. Processed food
  2. Raw potato peels and green potatoes
  3. Avocado skin and pit
  4. Raw meat
  5. Greasy food

 

You can see a list of what not to feed chickens here.

 

What scraps can chickens eat?

Some table scraps that are safe for chicken to consume are:

 

  1. Vegetables (cooked or raw)
  2. Fruits (leave the seeds out)
  3. Grain
  4. Oatmeal
  5. Corn (cooked, raw, and dried)
  6. Peas
  7. Bread
  8. Yogurt

 

Again, make sure that these foods are not moldy or spoiled. You might have also heard of feeding chicken expired yogurt. It’s not something to be frowned on. Feeding chicken yogurt helps even out chicken gut bacteria for a better digestion. You can also add a few tablespoons of yogurt when fermenting chicken feed.

 

Where can I buy chicken feed?

You can find chicken feed for sale at local farm stores. You can also find them on Amazon here.

 

How can I feed my chickens cheap?

To reduce chicken feed bill, free ranging would be a good idea. A garden can provide additional and natural feed for your chicken who sometimes don’t stop eating. Another option is to make your own chicken feed. Learn how to make chicken feed and check out my chicken feed recipe here.

 

What can I grow to feed chickens? 

Growing chicken feed is not complicated at all. Remember what was in grandma’s garden and sow them! Chickens can eat vegetables like corn, lettuce, kale, and any other leafy vegetable you usually grow. Sunflower and Millet are great seed producing plants too! These make great grower feed for chickens and organic chicken feed too.

10 Simple & Healthy After School Snacks Your Kids Will Love

10 Simple & Healthy After School Snacks Your Kids Will Love

Can y’all believe it’s back to school season already? I can’t believe that kids are starting to go back to school and that fall is almost here!

One thing that I’ve always noticed especially as school gets started again is that it can be SO HARD to find healthy snacks to feed your kids. They always come home starving and honestly they normally want junk food! And whether you’re a working parent or a stay at home parent it can be stressful to try and think of healthy snacks your kids will actually like.

So let me help you out. Here’s my list of some of my favorite after school snacks that are simple and healthy!

Apples and Peanut Butter

This one is a classic. I’m a huge fan of apples dipped in peanut butter and you kids definitely will be too!  I prefer to use all natural peanut butter like the one below because it has only one ingredient! Peanuts! If your kids have peanut allergies you can try out sun butter! It’s made with sunflower seeds so it’s a great alternative if there are any nut allergies in your home!

 

Homemade Popsicles

I love homemade popsicles! They are SO GOOD! I love to make them with fresh or frozen fruit and yogurt. Two of my favorite recipes are these pineapple popsicles and these berry popsicles. They only take five minutes to make and they’re a great healthy snack for your kids!

Homemade Goldfish

Yummy! Who doesn’t love goldfish? Especially when they’re homemade with ingredients you can trust. Check out this recipe for some homemade goldfish right here! They’re a great snack and your kids will love helping you make them!

Veggies and Hummus

This is definitely one of my favorite snacks and it’s so easy to make! All you need to do is chop up some veggies and let your kids dip them in hummus. You can buy hummus here or you can make your own! Hummus is super simple to make (this recipe takes less than 5 minutes!) and your kids will love it!

Cucumber Cups

How fun are these cucumber cups! They’re super yummy and packed full of nutrients and the filling is made with eggs! This recipe is a great way to feed your kids a healthy snack and use up all of your extra eggs! Check out the recipe here!

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Do you ever worry that your kids aren't getting enough protein? This snack combines the nutrition from the cucumbers with the protein and substance of boiled eggs. Each egg contains 6 grams of protein which is awesome for growing kids. Protein does so much more than just give you ‘strong muscles’…. Protein is an important component of every cell in the body. Hair and nails are mostly made of protein. You also use protein to make enzymes, hormones, and other body chemicals. Studies show that protein is by far the most filling macronutrient. It helps you feel fuller longer which is great for kids. Get the recipe using the link in our bio. https://www.superhealthykids.com/cucumber-cups-2/ #healthykids #mealplan #healthysnack #pickyeater #protein #healthyrecipe

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Homemade Granola Bars

Granola bars are the perfect snack for after school, especially when they’re homemade. This recipe is quick and easy and they’re no bake!

 

Greek Yogurt Covered Fruit

I love this idea! It’s a super simple snack and it will taste so good! All you have to do is dip the fruit of your choice in Greek Yogurt and freeze them for 15-30 minutes! It’s a quick and easy snack you can make for your kids!

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Yogurt covered strawberries 🍓 🍓 . Strawberries Greek Yogurt (your choice of flavor) Toppings (optional) . 1. Wash off the strawberries (optional: cut strawberries in half) 2. Using a toothpick, dip the strawberries in greek yogurt until fully covered 3. Place on wax paper or parchment paper 4. Freeze for 15 minutes 5. Dip strawberries again 6. Freeze 15 minutes 7. Enjoy! . . #strawberry #strawberries #strawberryrecipes #yogurt #healthyfood #healthylifestyle #cleaneating #nutrition #healthyeating #vegetarians #foodfacts #eats #eeeeeats #eatwell #mindfuleating #macros #fitfam #fitfood #foodporn #healthysnacks #snackfood #kidapproved #pickyeater #afterschoolsnack #nutrition #simonenutritionist

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Baked Sweet Potato Chips

I’ll admit it, I love chips! They’re one of my favorite snacks, but they’re definitely not a healthy snack choice. Which is why I love this recipe for baked sweet potato chips! These will only take about 10-15 minutes of prep time and then you just let them cook in the oven for a couple of hours! Simple!

Get the recipe here: Baked Sweet Potato Chips

Egg Snowmen

I LOVE THIS! I know it’s not winter yet (I’m already counting down the days until Christmas!) but I love these adorable egg snowmen! It’s a great way to use up those extra eggs you might have and your kids will love the creative and fun snack!

Banana Pancakes

Ok so sometimes your kids come home starving and want more than just a simple snack. That’s where these yummy 3 ingredient banana pancakes come in handy! You just need bananas, eggs, and baking powder and then you have a super quick and easy snack for your kids!

Get the recipe here: 3 Ingredient Banana Pancakes

What healthy snacks do your kids love? Tell me what snacks are your go to for after school in the comments below!

3 Ways To Use Rabbit Manure To Improve Your Garden!

3 Ways To Use Rabbit Manure To Improve Your Garden!

As you probably know, we raise rabbits on our homestead, which means we have a LOT of rabbit manure.

 

What you may not know is that rabbit manure is one of the easiest to use, yet super healthy, fertilizers for your garden. In this article, I’m going to show you how to use rabbit poop to improve your harvest.

 

Garden compost made from animal manure does two amazing things for your garden. First, it’s a free byproduct of your animals, so it’ll save money on topsoil and fertilizer. Second, it is a nutrient rich way to help your garden grow and thrive.

 

Why Rabbit Manure?

 

Great question! Unlike other manures which have to be well composted before you can even think of using it in your garden, rabbit poop can be immediately applied to your soil. It won’t burn crops, and can be used as a stand-alone planting medium or mixed with topsoil (although your best bet is to mix it with soil.)

 

As rabbit manure decomposes, it helps build up the structure of the soil, and injects valuable nutrients and organisms into your garden that will promote strong, speedy plant growth.

 

Rabbit manure, in particular, is rich in potassium, nitrogen, zinc, and calcium, and it’s one of the most nitrogen-rich manures out there – so you’ll get lush, green, well-fertilized growth. The potassium will also improve the quality of the fruit your vegetable plant sets.

 

Finally, unlike cow, horse, or pig poop, rabbit manure is odorless – so as you collect it and incorporate it into your garden, your nose (and your neighbors!) will thank you.


Want more awesome gardening tips? Check out my book, Organic By Choice: The (Secret) Rebel’s Guide To Backyard Gardening.

Organic by Choice


How to Use Rabbit Manure In Your Garden

 

First decide on the source of your rabbit manure. If your kids have pet rabbits, have them collect the rabbit’s waste each day. If you already raise bunnies on your homestead, then what are you waiting for? Go start collecting rabbit manure for the garden!

 

Collecting it is relatively easy, and everyone has their own “system.” One of the simplest methods is to place plastic tubs under your rabbits’ cages and dump them out every day (don’t wait on this – flies WILL lay eggs which will hatch into maggots – GROSS.)

 

You can dump them into a compost pile, or directly into your garden. If you haven’t planted anything in your garden yet, then till the rabbit manure to a 2-inch depth.

 

If your garden is already established, then side dress your plants with the manure – it’s usually best to do this as your plants are flowering and setting fruit. They’ll need all the nutrients they can get during that time!

 

If you just got your rabbits, or don’t want to raise any but definitely want to use bunny poop in your garden, then you might also be able to find rabbit manure to buy. Check with neighbors or even Craigslist in your area.

 

How to Make Rabbit Manure Compost

Not everyone is enchanted with the idea of directly applying manure to their garden. That’s ok – you can compost the rabbit poop.

 

To make rabbit manure compost, mix the poop with other compost ingredients that will decompose, such as fruit peelings (like bananas), bits of leftover food, coffee grounds, and grass clippings, and leaves.

 

Add equal parts of wood shavings and straw, then blend all these things (and other kitchen waste) thoroughly, then add enough water to moisten. Be very careful not to completely saturate the compost pile.

 

Cover with a protective tarp and turn every two weeks. If you’re hot composting (which is unlikely with rabbit poop but, hey, stranger things have happened!), then water regularly to maintain heat and humidity levels. Keep adding to the pile and turning and blending it until it fully composts.

 

If you’re cold composting, then simply turn the pile until the manure and other ingredients have turned to sweet-smelling soil.

 

Making Rabbit Manure Tea for A Larger Garden Harvest

 

A third option, other than putting rabbit manure on your garden directly or composting it, is to make a tea fertilizer. Luckily, this is pretty simple.

 

In a 5 gallon bucket, place a burlap bag. Fill the bag about half way with rabbit manure (or however much manure you have on hand), and close it tight with string.

 

Add water to the bucket until the burlap bag is full submerged. Allow your tea to “brew” for 5-7 days, stirring daily. Once the allotted time has passed, simply remove the bag of manure from the bucket.

 

You can use the tea directly on your garden, and compost the rabbit manure, or use it on your garden as well.

 

I’d like to hear from you!

Do you use rabbit manure in your garden? Leave a comment below!

Check Out My Other Rabbit Articles:


Do you love gardening, herbs, natural remedies, self sufficiency, and/or homesteading? Learn how to grow 30 different herbs in this encyclopedia! Herbs In Your Backyard is a digital book, delivered to you INSTANTLY!

Herbs in Your Backyard


 

Can Chickens Eat Citrus? Why Everything You Think You Know Is Wrong [Podcast]

Can Chickens Eat Citrus? Why Everything You Think You Know Is Wrong [Podcast]

Can chickens eat citrus? You’ll be surprised not just by the answer, but by how wrong the myths out there about feeding citrus to chickens really are.

 

Frequently, we see advice online that advises us to not feed our backyard chickens things like oranges, limes, and lemons.

 

And in reality, many chickens don’t even like them. Mine don’t.

 

Sometimes we get fresh produce from a local grocery store (that they otherwise would toss), and while grapes, bananas, and watermelon are snarfed down amazingly quick, citrus is pretty much left to rot. 

 

what herbs can chickens eat content upgrade-min

 

Even the pigs won’t touch it! (Who knew pigs were so discerning?)

 

But the bottom line is feeding oranges and lemons has some amazing health benefits not just for your chickens, but for their eggs and meat.

 

I think you’ll be shocked by some of the things you’ll discover in this podcast.

 

You’ll learn:

  • Why the myths surrounding feeding citrus are bogus
  • How oranges and lemons can help your chickens combat heat stress
  • The herb you always want to feed with citrus (and how to do just that)
  • How citrus can improve the quality of the eggs you’ll ultimately eat

Links we discuss:

Butcher Box 

The Better Egg

Where to buy dried orange peel

Where to buy dried lemon peel

 

Think chickens shouldn't eat citrus? You couldn't be more wrong. Discover why all those myths are bunk, and how feeding oranges and lemons improves their eggs.

 

Transcript:

Coming soon.

 

I’d like to hear from you!

Do you think you’ll try feeding citrus to your chickens? Why or why not? Leave a comment below!