How To Keep Your Chickens Safe On Halloween

How To Keep Your Chickens Safe On Halloween

So I’m a huge fan of Halloween! I think it’s so fun for kids and I love the costumes, the pumpkins, and all of the fall decorations.

However, especially if you’re raising chickens in an urban or suburban area, Halloween can be a pretty stressful and scary time for your chickens. So today we’re going to talk about how to keep your chickens safe on Halloween.

Now the thing about Halloween, is that it’s really fun for us humans, but for animals it can be kind of a scary time, especially if you have domestic animals. There’s going to be a lot more activity in your neighborhood during Halloween and that can be very stressful for chickens and other pets.

 

Trick-or Treating People

The number one thing to remember during Halloween and Trick-or-Treating, is that not every neighborhood Trick-or-Treats at night.

Usually chickens will go in their coop at night and you’ll keep them safely cooped up all night long night, so you might think you don’t need to take any extra steps to keep them safe.

But some areas tend to have Trick-or-Treating hours during the day, or at dusk, right before sunset, which are times when your chickens might be out and about and hunting and pecking instead of safely in their coop.

So you definitely want to make sure that you coop your chickens up during the hours of Trick-or-Treating, especially if they’re during the day.

More and more neighborhoods are shifting more towards day hours to protect kids. And so younger kids who might go to bed earlier, can still enjoy Trick-or-Treating.

So definitely make sure that your chickens are cooped up. And make sure that the coops are secure. You’re going to want to make sure that other people can’t easily get into your coop. 

I would also consider keeping your chickens cooped up the night before Halloween because that tends to be mischief night. Mischief night is a big deal in some areas.

It’s not such a big deal in our area. We live in a very rural neighborhood, and I grew up in a rural neighborhood where we actually never got Trick-or-Treaters.

But in some areas that I have lived in, mischief night has been a big deal, especially if you have a lot of teenagers around or young adults who might be impetuous.

It could be a pretty disastrous situation for your chickens. So my suggestion is just all Halloween, the night before Halloween and Halloween day, and that block of time around Halloween, just keep your chickens cooped up, or if you do allow them to forage and run around, supervise them just for the sake of safety.

It’s not worth somebody possibly harming your chickens, to let them roam around free.

My recommendation is that you keep your chickens cooped up or make sure that they are being supervised, so that you can make sure they stay safe.

 

Dogs

This is another reason why you should coop your chickens up on Halloween. A lot of people, as they’re taking their kids around Trick-or-Treating, bring their dog with them. And we all know that even the most family friendly dog, when it sees a chicken, can turn into a killer.

I know this from personal experience. Our dog was a great family dog. Loved people and was so friendly, but the second he got around a chicken, he turned into a chicken killer.

Not every dog out there is going to be like that, obviously. But you really don’t want to take the chance that’s somebody’s neighborhood dog could get at your chickens. That’s just another reason to keep your chickens cooped up earlier on Halloween.

 

Predators

Because of all the candy and all the food around during Halloween, predators might be a bigger issue. Namely, things like possums and raccoons.

Raccoons are pretty nondiscriminatory when it comes to what they eat. If it’s there, they’re going to go for it.

So because of all the candy and food around, raccoons are more likely to be out than they would any other night. They’re going to be out every night, but they’re probably going to be out in droves on Halloween (and probably a couple days after too).

So I recommend that you double check that your coop is secure, so that your chickens will be safe from predators.

Traffic

Another reason to keep your chickens cooped up around Trick-or-Treat time, is because of higher volumes of traffic. I remember when we were kids, my parents didn’t want to walk with their kids from house to house. It’s not fun. It’s tiring. You’re an adult. You’ve been working all day. So what do you do? You get the car out.

The problem with this, (I’m sure you’re already put it all together) is that chickens sometimes aren’t the brightest when it comes to traffic. I know mine aren’t. We’ve actually never had a chicken get hit, but it can happen because people aren’t paying attention. They’re watching their kids. They’re watching the dog. They’re not paying attention to what your chickens are doing.

Then there’s the people who’ll hit your chickens on purpose. So best advice, during Trick-or-Treat hours, after Trick-or-Treat hours, and on mischief night, just keep your chickens cooped up.

Your chickens won’t be harmed in any way by keeping them cooped up. Just make sure that they have plenty of food and water. You can give them extra treats and boredom busters to keep them entertained, but I would recommend you keep them in their coop.

Candy

Don’t be tempted to give your chickens candy. As we all know, chickens are curious creatures, and when given the opportunity, they’ll taste anything. If you’ve been thinking about giving them candy during Halloween, don’t do it. Just don’t do it. They don’t need it.

There are plenty of other healthy treat options you can give your chickens if you want to spoil them on Halloween. You could give them corn (real corn, NOT candy corn!), lettuce, Black Soldier Fly Larvae, mealworms, or one of my treat mixes, but please don’t give them candy.

Now another thing to keep in mind, is to make sure that you keep your trash cans lidded up tightly, so that your chickens can’t scavenge in the trash cans.

For the most part they’ll pretty much eat whatever they can find. Candy can mess with their blood sugar and it can mess with a whole ton of other things.

The other thing is that certain candies, such as hard candies, gumballs, or candy corn, can be choking hazards for your chickens. Once they swallow the candy it goes into their crop. Eventually it hits the gizzard. The gizzard has rocks in it and it grinds everything up.

But in the meantime, as it’s going down the esophagus, there’s a chance that they might choke on it. Especially if it’s something big and hard.

Don’t give your chickens candy and try not to throw candy in your yard. You just want to make sure that your yard is fairly clean before you let your chickens out of their coop again.

Chances of them choking on candy are probably slim (they could also just as easily choke on a piece of hard corn) but for the sake of making things easy on ourselves, just avoid giving your chickens candy.

The final thing that I’ll say about candy, is to not give your chickens anything that’s been unwrapped. As an example of this is, some families prefer to give out healthy treats, so they’ll give out apples, or oranges, or bananas.

My suggestion is although it might be tempting to throw them in the compost pile, or to feed it to your chickens as their Halloween treat, don’t feed them anything that’s come from another person that’s been unwrapped.

It’s the same reason as we don’t give it to our children. You don’t know what somebody’s put in it. You don’t know if they’ve put poison in it. You don’t know if they’ve put pins in it.

We all hear the stories every year of somebody where someone found pins or other stuff in their kid’s Halloween candy. It can happen. My suggestion is stay safe, don’t feed your chickens any unwrapped fruit or vegetables from other people, because again, you don’t know what’s been in them.

Candy Wrappers

So as we all know, chickens are opportunistic eaters. They might very well go ahead and try and eat candy wrappers. And that’s definitely not good for them.

So just make sure that when your kids are eating the candy that all the candy wrappers get cleaned up so your chickens don’t accidentally ingest them.

Candy wrappers are something that could very easily mess with your chickens digestive system. It might not hurt them immediately, but it could cause some serious problems later on.

Make sure your chickens can’t get at any candy wrappers and be sure that you keep your trashcans lidded so that your chickens can’t get in them and dig around and accidentally ingest a candy wrapper or anything else that they really should not be eating.

It’s good to keep the raccoons away too, so I highly suggest you lid your garbage cans.

 

Can your chickens eat pumpkins or gourds?

We’ve talked about all of the scary stuff, so now let’s talk about feeding your chickens pumpkins! If you have unpainted pumpkins or other sorts of gourds, go ahead and chop them up and feed them to your chickens.

They will absolutely love you for it! If the pumpkin or the gourd has been painted, I probably would not feed the peel itself to your chickens. We don’t really know what’s in those paints so it’s not good for them. And as the person eating their eggs, you don’t want to ingest any of that either.

Go ahead and cut away the painted part, then feed it to your chickens. If the whole outside has been painted, maybe just cut it open and scoop out the interior.

There is a belief that pumpkin seeds can help your chickens with worms. I don’t really see any proof of that, but at the end of the day, the chickens love the seeds. They think they taste great and they’re good for them. And the pumpkin itself is very good for them. It has a lot of nutrients in it!

My one tip when it comes to pumpkin and gourds, is to wait to buy them until the day after Halloween. The grocery stores in our area heavily discount gourds after Halloween, so I will often buy like 10 gourds for only five bucks.

I feed them to my pigs, I feed them to the chickens. We even feed them to our goats too!

It’s a perfect opportunity for people like us to go score really inexpensive food for our chickens and the other livestock on our farm. It’s super healthy for them and they love it! They get to dig through it and they’ll just have the best time ever.

So yes, your chickens can eat pumpkins and gourds. They will love it, and it’ll be very nutritious for them. So go ahead and feed them away to your flock!

So that’s all folks, I hope you were able to learn a little bit more about how to keep your chickens safe for Halloween! Let me know in the comments below what you do to keep you chickens safe for Halloween!

October Chicken Coop Checklist: What To Do In Your Coop In October

October Chicken Coop Checklist: What To Do In Your Coop In October

It’s fall, y’all….and that means you gotta make sure your backyard chickens are ready before the cold sets in.

 

I know in some parts of Canada (looking at you, Alberta) that it’s already snowing….but for most of the United States, it’s just starting to get cool.

 

And there’s lots you can do right now BOTH to celebrate the season AND prepare your flock for the upcoming wind and ice.

 

Although chickens weather winter pretty well in most locations (their feathers help!), just a few tweaks can mean an easier time when the mercury dips.

 

Even if you live in a temperate climate, there’s ideas on this list to help your backyard chicken flock stay healthy year round.

 

There’s also LOTS of treat ideas to make the most out of fall!

 

Give a good clean out before cold sets in

Now is the time to give your coop a final clean before the cold makes it miserable outside. You likely won’t want to clean it again (a deep clean at least) until the spring thaw.

 

In addition to sweeping out any old bedding, be sure to wash off any accumulated poop on or under roosting bars, and wipe down nesting boxes that might have bits of broken egg or feathers lodged in them.

 

If you have a wooden or cement floor, give it a good wash to reduce the chances of ammonia build up, which can effect your chickens’ lungs.

 

Decide how to keep water from freezing

Now is the time to figure out how you’ll keep water unfrozen in your chicken coop. Will you use heated bowls, solar energy, or add water throughout the day?

 

There’s lots of options (you can view them in this article about keeping water from freezing), and you’ll have to find one that works for your particular situation.

 

Remember, what works in Southern Missouri likely won’t work in Northern Dakota, right?

 

Keep an eye on local super markets for pumpkin sales

This time of year, there’s lots of pumpkins to buy. Don’t pay retail – wait until they go on sale and stock up for your backyard chickens.

 

Pumpkin is very healthy for chickens, with lots of vitamins and nutrients for chickens – and they love pecking at it!

 

Most stores start to discount pumpkins well before October 31.

 

Pumpkins keep for a while, and stored in a cool, dry location, you can have healthy treats for your hens for the next month or two!

 

If you REALLY want to buy one now, you can make a cute coop decoration by carving out a pumpkin into a flower pot.

 

After a week, you can then feed it to your chickens! Just make sure you use flowers that aren’t poisonous.

 

Help molting hens or hens experiencing feather loss from roosters with a high protein diet.

Yep, every fall, some or all of your chickens will lose their feathers due to molt.

 

It’s normal – and there’s something you can do to help regrow those feathers quickly!

 

Giving your flock a high protein diet that include black soldier fly larvae or Fluffiest Feathers Ever! (28% protein) is an easy way to provide a high protein diet – and chickens LOVE both!

 

Double check coop security – food is getting scarce for predators.

While predators might leave your fluffy butts alone during summer, as the days get shorter and food becomes more scarce, they might turn an eye to your chickens.

 

Now is the time to check that your coop is completely secure and make adjustments as needed.

 

Make sure all doors and windows latch tightly, and upgrade the wiring around your coop if necessary. You don’t want predators to get OVER your coop walls or UNDER them!

 

See tracks and not sure what predator is hanging around? Check out my predator footprint guide here!

 

Head out to farmers markets and/or orchards.

You can usually purchase seconds (bruised or unattractive fruit that’s still fresh and edible) for pennies on the dollar. They still make great treats for your fluffy butts!

 

Some great ideas for fruit and veggies to feed backyard chickens are peaches (without the pits), apples (without the seeds), and leafy greens!

 

You can also grow your own leafy greens over winter for your backyard chickens with this guide.

What To Do In Your Chicken Coop In September

What To Do In Your Chicken Coop In September

September is here…..which means it’s time to think about what to do in your chicken coop in September!

 

It’s pumpkin season, and there’s lots you can do in your coop this month! Help your flock stay healthy and keep your coop in top shape with these tips!

 

If it gets cold early in your area, do a final deep clean before cool weather sets in.

You won’t want to do it when the ground is frozen and you need 3 sets of gloves to stay warm. If you live in a temperate area, now is still the time to deep clean your coop before the days get shorter and you run out of time.

 

You can also decide if the deep litter method is for you.

silkie pullet backyard chicken

Double check windows/doors for tight seals during chilly fall nights

When the wind is howling and there’s freezing rain, those tight seals can mean the difference between life and death. Just double check all your windows and doors seal well, and if not, fix it.

 

Offer your flock pumpkin and/or pumpkin seeds every week. They’ll love the treat, and it’s super healthy for them!

Pumpkin is full of vitamins and minerals, and chickens LOVE to peck at it. The pumpkin seeds might (repeat, might) help your flock rid themselves of worms (studies are inconclusive, but it’s can’t hurt), or at the very least, provide a yummy distraction since bugs and leaves are dying off.

 

You can also make a pumpkin planter like this one, and offer it to your flock when you’re done with it. Just be sure not to paint it!

 

If you have chicks, double check your coop stays the right temperature at night.

This will depend on the age of your chicks – if they only have down or are partially feathered, they will need your help to stay warm.

 

If not, either fix it or come up with a plan to keep chicks warm enough until they’re fully feathered. Remember that heat lamps get very hot and can cause a fire, so avoid them.

 

Hang some fall wreaths or add fall flowers to window boxes

Fall is all about color – and adding a wreath or flowers to your window boxes can brighten up your surroundings and help your flock feel pampered.

 

Backyard chicken coop window

 

If your coop is painted, do a fresh coat before cool weather sets in so your coop looks bright and colorful when the leaves are gone.

Ditto above. When fall’s colors fade, you’ll be glad you made the extra effort to repaint your coop so it looks cheerful even when it’s grey outside.

 

Start adding even more protein to your flock’s diet with mealworms, black soldier fly larvae, or Fluffiest Feathers Ever!

If your flock is molting, a high protein diet will help their feathers regrow. High protein diets also make sure flocks are in great shape to battle the cooler weather. You can feed a high protein diet or treats full time, or just during the molting season.

 

Make a plan for how you’ll keep their water from freezing

It’s bound to happen if you live in a cool area – so now is the time to decide how you’ll prevent freezing, or at least keep fresh water consistently available.

 

Here’s my best ideas for keeping your chickens’ water from freezing.

 

Spend more time with your flock – soon, the weather will be cold and you won’t want to be outside as much.

Nuff said. Here’s a great treat you can make – it includes pumpkin seeds, sage, and more!

 

Add a light to your coop if you want eggs all winter.

As the days get shorter, your hens might stop laying. This is natural, but it’s okay to still want eggs all winter. If you do, then add a light to their coop.

 

If you don’t have power in your coop, you can use a solar generator or a battery powered light. The bulb should stay cool and be a daylight simulator. You can also use a timer to turn it automatically on and off.

What To Do In Your Coop In November

What To Do In Your Coop In November

November is here…..and there’s plenty you can do in your chicken coop to keep your hens and roosters healthy.

 

Fall is typically when we see an uptick in predators AND you might notice signs your flock is slowing down due to the lack of light and the cold.

 

You likely already noticed your chickens aren’t laying as many eggs…..and there’s lots of reasons for that!

 

Now is when your flock needs some extra TLC and support.

 

Here’s 7 care items you should do in November to raise a healthy flock of backyard chickens!

backyard chicken baby chick

Buy all the pumpkins you can at a hefty discount

Get out there and start hauling some pumpkins home. Leftover Halloween pumpkins go for about $1 after everyone’s done trick or treating.

 

Ones to especially keep an eye on are the “ugly” pumpkins, also known as Hubbard squashes.

 

They’re typically $9 before Halloween, but you can score them for nearly free, since most people don’t realize they’re edible!

 

Store your haul in a cool, dark location. They’ll keep for months, and you’ll be providing your flock with LOTS of juicy nutrients right when they need it most.

 

Want ALL the pumpkins a store has? You might be able to get a bulk discount if you talk to the manager!

 

Be sure to remove the rind before feeding or crack them open – your chickens likely WON’T peck through the hard rind.

 

Have a plan for freezing rain days

Freezing rain is even more deadly than snow or even sub zero temperatures. And the WORST is when it starts to rain and you have no way to keep your flock dry and warm.

 

Make a plan NOW and decide how you’ll deal with freezing rain so your chickens stay warm. Is your run uncovered? Can you cover it at the drop of a hat?

 

Is your coop completely enclosed? What will you do if a hen is wet, and it’s 20 degrees outside?

 

Making these decisions NOW makes life easier down the road for you AND your backyard chickens.

 

Check for signs of predators

Prevent a problem before it becomes a big problem. Don’t wait for a hen to go missing – look for signs of predators and get rid of them before you lose a backyard chicken.

 

Look for:

  • Footprints
  • Flighty flock/sudden change in flock behavior
  • Critters getting into your trash or other signs

 

Signs such as footprints and a trash-filled yard are easy to spot signs. But flock behavior requires a bit more introspection on your side.

 

Note your flock’s behavior: Have they suddenly stopped going to one part of your property? Are they insisting on roosting constantly?

 

Any behavior that’s different is a sign that a predator might be around.

 

If you have a “gut feeling” something isn’t right but you can’t tell exactly what, you can always install a game camera.

backyard chicken rooster with comb

Want eggs? Add a light bulb to your coop

This time of year, I get LOTS of questions about why chickens stop laying eggs. Usually, it’s due to the fewer daylight hours.

 

If you want an egg supply during the winter, try adding a daylight simulating bulb to your chicken coop, and let it run 2 hours before dawn and 2 hours after sunset.

 

Of course, if you don’t want eggs, then skip this suggestion!

 

Take photos of your flock with all the autumn leaves!

Don’t forget to enjoy this season – fall only happens once a year, and it’s a HUGE photo opp!

 

Spend a few afternoons taking photos of your chickens against the pretty fall leaves. You won’t regret it!

 

If you’re not a great photographer, you can always hire a pro! People hire photographers for their dogs, right?

 

Add “warming spices” on cold days

Certain spices will increase circulation, which can help your flock get an extra little kick of warmth.

 

Some options are:

  • Chili
  • Nutmeg
  • Sage
  • Prickly Ash

 

You can add the herbs to their feed to ensure your flock eats them. Just a pinch per chicken will do!

 

Provide herbs that are traditionally used to support healthy immune systems

You might worry your flock will feel the effects of winter, just like humans do. To support them and to raise healthy backyard chickens, you can add herbs to their feed.

 

These herbs are traditionally used to support healthy immune systems:

  • Oregano
  • Garlic
  • Calendula
  • Elderberries
  • Echinacea

 

You can feed them separately or together in an herbal blend such as PCM StrongHen.

 

Do a sweep to check for mice or rats

Lastly, do an inspection to double check no mice or rats have taken up residence in your coop. Especially in older coops, there can be nooks and crannies.

 

Mice and rats will make messes, leave diseases and fleas, and possibly cause your backyard chickens to get upset, or at least change their daily patterns. Not good!<!– Default Statcounter code for Chicken-coop-november
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8+ DIY Holiday Decorations For Your Chicken Coop

8+ DIY Holiday Decorations For Your Chicken Coop

So I tend to go a little bit overboard with Christmas decorations every year.

I love Christmas, so I have to try and reign myself in every year when I want to decorate my house all out for the holidays. I’ve been looking at Christmas decorations on Pinterest all week (obviously) and I realized that I need to start decorating my chicken coop for the holidays! I think having holiday decor on the chicken coop might motivate me to leave my warm house to go check on my chickens. Or at least it would make a trip out to the coop more enjoyable right?

So today I thought I would share some of my absolute favorite DIY Christmas decorations for the chicken coop with all of you. Most of these DIY decorations you can make for cheap, or maybe even for free! So let’s get going, here are my favorite DIY Holiday decorations for your chicken coop.

Pine Cone Wreath

Wouldn’t one of these pine cone wreaths look fantastic on your chicken coop? If you have a pine tree in your backyard you could make this simple DIY wreath practically for free. You can find the tutorial here: Making Pine Cone Wreaths

Chicken Coop Garland

I love this adorable chicken coop garland for your hens made from fruit and chicken treats! Not only is this garland adorable, but it’s also a great boredom buster for your hens during the winter months. You can find the tutorial here: Festive Garland for a Chicken Coop

Holiday Herb & Berry Wreath

I’ve made this adorable wreath for my chicken coop, and my chickens love it. It looks adorable, and yes your chickens are supposed to eat it! It’s a great way to feed your chickens herbs in a fun and festive way! Tutorial here: Holiday Herb & Berry Wreath

Hot Chocolate Bar

Ok, so this isn’t exactly for your chicken coop, but after running out to the coop to check on my chickens in freezing weather, I definitely need some hot chocolate. So this DIY decoration is for the chicken owner:) I love the idea of creating an everyday hot chocolate bar because who doesn’t want hot chocolate everyday? This DIY project is super simple and I love how fun and festive it would make a small corner of your kitchen feel. Tutorial: Everyday Hot Chocolate Bar

Feed Bag Stocking

Isn’t this a great idea to use your leftover feed bags? You can make feed bag stockings to hang on your chicken coop for free using your empty chicken feed bags. Tutorial here: Feed Bag Stockings

Edible Christmas Garlands

Here’s another fun Christmas garland idea for your chicken coop. This one is made from radishes, cranberries, Brussels sprouts, and boiled eggs! This probably wouldn’t last long in my chicken coop, but it’s a fun and simple Christmas decoration! You can find the tutorial here: Edible Christmas Garland

Cookie Tin Water Heater

This cookie tin water heater is festive and practical! It keeps your chickens’ water from freezing! I love that this project is festive and useful at the same time! Here’s the tutorial: Cookie Tin Water Heater

Festive Chicken Coop

Don’t you love this coop? It looks STUNNING and it would be fairly simple to replicate! You can see more pictures of this adorable coop here: Holiday Chicken Coop

Do you decorate your chicken coop for the holidays? What chicken coop decorations do you love?

10+ Amazing, Must Make DIY Fall Decorations For Your Coop

10+ Amazing, Must Make DIY Fall Decorations For Your Coop

I LOVE fall! I know once August hits y’all are pulling out your pumpkin spice candles and counting down the days until you can start wearing sweaters. I’m with you!

One of my favorite things about fall is the decorations. I love decorating for fall and there’s nothing better than fall chicken coop decorations.

We’re building a couple of new coops and so I’m super excited this year to be able to try out some of these AMAZING chicken coop decorations!

DIY Pumpkin Vase 

I made this pumpkin vase for my chicken coop last year, and you can bet I’m going to make it again this year! It’s a cheap and easy project that is the perfect fall coop decoration! And when you’re done with this decoration your chickens can eat the pumpkins and the mums! For detailed instruction on how to make this cute vase you can read my article right here.

Looking for a cute fall decoration for your chicken coop? Make a vase out of pumpkins! (Hint: It's also super nutritious for your hens!)

 

Fall Wreath

I am loving this super cute fall wreath for a decoration for your chicken coop! Here’s a tutorial to make one yourself right here or if you don’t have time to DIY you can buy one right here.

Rustic Welcome Outdoor Sign

I love this rustic welcome sign. It’s so easy to make and you can adjust the wreath based on the season! I’m so excited to make this welcome sign for one of our coops and use a fall wreath! You can find the full tutorial for this welcome sign right here!

 

Recycled Bicycle Garden Planter

I LOVE this cute recycled bike garden planter that my friend, Adrianne made for her garden! I love that this garden planter can be used for different seasons too! For fall I’m going to fill the planter basket with orange and yellow flowers (and maybe even some pumpkins) to add a super cute fall touch to the area around my chicken coop!

Happy Fall Y’all Sign

I love this sign! I think it’s so fun! I don’t have a tutorial for this project, but it should be simple to make! All you need is a wood board, some paint, and a little creativity!

Fall Window Box 

I LOVE window boxes for chicken coops! We added this cute window box to one of the new coops we’re building here on the farm! It’s so cute and it’s perfect for fall! Looking for more window box ideas? I’ve got you covered. Check out this post with all of my favorite window boxes!

Backyard chicken coop window

DIY Fall Sign Post

This is hands down my favorite fall decoration I’ve seen! I LOVE this cute fall sign post! It’s quick and easy to make and it will look fantastic outside of your chicken coop! Check out the full tutorial here!

PUMPKINS!

Isn’t this coop adorable! I love how they incorporated mums and pumpkins to give the coop a beautiful fall feel! Even if you don’t have a space like this one to place pumpkins on your coop, you can still place pumpkins around the coop! They’re a super cute and easy way to decorate your coop for fall! (And you chickens can eat them too!)

If you want the plans for this specific chicken coop head on over to my 55+ free coop plans article!

Painted Pumpkins

And speaking of pumpkins, you can also paint your pumpkins for a gorgeous coop decoration! I love this hello fall pumpkin!

I also love how simple it is to make this! All you need is a hello fall stencil (like the one below) and some white paint and you’re good to go! It’s a super simple project that makes the perfect decoration for your chicken coop!

 Corn Husk Wreath

I LOVE this! Not only is it a very inexpensive decoration for your coop, but it looks amazing! Check out the tutorial to make this corn husk wreath here!

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It's that time of the year again! Not many know this but I started my business off by just making wreaths about 4 years ago. I don't really make them much anymore, but I LOVE making these corn husk wreaths for fall. We've had ours for going on 3 years now and it looks just as good as the day I made it. 🎃🌽 . These are made to order and I will only be making a limited amount this year, they are listed in my Etsy shop link in bio. ☺️ . . #whimsicallychicboutique #handmadesign #etsyhandmade #sign #woodensign #walldecor #homedecor #decor #shoplocal #shopsmall #etsyseller #signs #woodsign #handmadewithlove #wallart #rusticdecor #farmhousechic #farmhousedecor #etsyshop #makersgonnamake #handmadeisbetter #smallbiz #mclsignmakers #signmaker #cornhusk #cornhuskwreath #falldecor #fall #wreath #fallwreath

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Metal Cart

I love this cute metal cart because it would be so easy to add some cute fall decorations to! You could fill it with pumpkins or corn stalks and it would look amazing around your coop! You can buy this basket right here.

Fall Signs

I love this cute fall sign! And it’s a simple project that you can put outside of your coop! Chicken coop signs are an easy and adorable decoration that are awesome for any chicken coop!

Chalkboard Platter Wreath

So clearly I’m a little bit obsessed with wreaths…but I just love how cute they look on my coop door! I love that you can customize the saying on this wreath because it’s a chalkboard! Here’s the full tutorial!

Well that’s all for now folks. What fall decorations are you going to add to your coop this year? I’d love to here about it in the comments below!