13 Heartwarming Stories Of Animals Rescued During Hurricane Harvey

13 Heartwarming Stories Of Animals Rescued During Hurricane Harvey

Hurricane Harvey didn’t just impact millions of people – it was also devastating to pets and livestock who lost their families.

 

Rescuers have spent hundreds of man hours rescuing pets from the rising waters, braving the floods that could have killed them to bring dogs, cats, horses and more to safety.

 

Shockingly, in many cases, the animals weren’t just abandoned to save themselves – many of them were purposely locked up by their humans to meet whatever fate awaited.

 

Luckily, rescuers got to these 10 lucky pets before the rising waves ended their lives.

 

Here’s 10 heartwarming stories of humans who went out of their way to rescue pets and in some cases, reunite them with their owners!

 

This dog who jumped into a rescuer’s Jeep, and thanks to one man and the power of Twitter, was reunited with his family.

 

These 120 cats from the Cattery Cat Shelter who were evacuated by the SPCA of Texas before Hurricane Harvey hit Corpus Christi:

 

 

These adorable kittens rescued by a brave woman from underneath a porch in Houston:

 

These adorable baby squirrels who were taken in by the Wildlife Center of Texas:

 

These poor dogs thankfully rescued from locked kennel before the water got too high:

 

If you have animals and can't get them out let me know so I can come get them. To the sick assholes that left these two poor dogs locked in a kennel on your porch to drown, hope God had a special plan for you.

Posted by Jared Carter on Sunday, August 27, 2017

 

This lucky dog that was rescued from flooding waters by concerned citizens:

These panicking horses locked in a flooded pen and saved by a brave teen before the worst happened:

All animals were saved

Posted by Chance Ward on Monday, August 28, 2017

 

Frankie & Bear, two stranded dogs lucky to be saved by rescuers:

 

This unfortunate dog that was tied to a post and saved by a photographer:

 

This pet pig, whose family refused to leave him behind:

Family Flees The Hurricane With Their Pet Pig

When Hurricane Harvey hit, this family knew they couldn't leave their sweet pet pig behind 🐷💙

Posted by The Dodo on Friday, September 1, 2017

 

“Harvey the Hurricane Hawk” who took shelter in a man’s vehicle after becoming injured and unable to get to safety:

 

 

(Harvey is currently being cared for by the Texas Wildlife Rehab Coalition.)

 

This VERY vocal pig rescued from high water in Texas.

This herd of cattle who were thankfully moooooved to safety by Texas police:

 

10+ Ways to Preserve Your Harvest Without Canning!

10+ Ways to Preserve Your Harvest Without Canning!

On our farm, we preserve a lot of food without canning – and often, it’s easier, faster, and better to leave the canning jars on the shelf.

 

Particularly if you’re not familiar with pressure canning, or if you’re unsure about starting, you might be wondering how you can preserve meat, fruit, or dairy.

 

(You might have heard about some ways to can things like dairy – but we debunk those myths in this article).

 

In this article, I’m going to show you some ancient ways our ancestors used to preserve fruit, vegetables, meat, dairy, and eggs – and you can use these same tactics in your own home!

How to preserve food without canning

 

Preserving Fruit

Preserving fruit without canning includes the obvious choices of fermenting and drying, but had you thought of preserving fresh fruit in honey or sugar? 

 

Apples

To preserve the flavor of apples, people would wrap the fruit in paper, straw, or cloth soaked with grease such as oil or fat. Apples were then stacked in a wooden crate and placed in cool area such as a root cellar.

 

A favorite of colonial Americans was cider molasses, which is boiled from fresh apple cider, and used to flavor desserts or breakfasts. You can learn to make it here.

 

The leftover peels from making cider were then fermented to make apple cider vinegar – nothing went to waste!

 

You CAN preserve food without canning - here's 10+ ways to do it!

 

Berries

Like apples, berries were preserved by fermenting them into wine or vinegars. During winter, wine could keep for months – even years, and was safer to drink than water.

 

Berries were dried and used in desserts and main courses, either by reconstituting them in water or used as dried fruit, or eaten plain like we do nowadays.

 

Fruit could also be preserved in honey by dropping the fruit into a jar filled with honey. Since honey is naturally antiseptic, the fruit wouldn’t rot, and would even impart their flavor on honey.  

 

The fruit would then be pulled from the honey as needed and used in desserts or flavored mead would be made from the honey.

 

 

Preserving Vegetables & Legumes

Vegetables traditionally have been preserved by fermenting, drying, keeping in a cool place by packing them with wet leaves or sand, or keeping them in the ground before hard frosts hit.

 

Onions

Onions were pulled from the ground when the stalks browned, and were ripened by laying them on their sides to dry. To store them, the green stalks were intact and braided to store onions easily-circulating air.

 

 

Cabbage

Cabbage was dried and often used in soups and stews, but the most traditional way to preserve cabbage was by fermenting it in crocks like this one. Nowadays, you can also use kits that make it easy like this one. To learn how to ferment veggies, click here.

 

 

Beans

Beans were dried on the bush or vines and then strung up to continue drying and to store them. Families then strung them in their homes where they would be in easy reach. The dried beans then were soaked overnight to soften before being cooked and eaten.

 

 

Corn

To preserve it, corn kernels were dried then soaked and added to stews and soups or ground into meal, but more interestingly, our ancestors also dried corn into hominy, which was then turned into grits.

 

To harvest hominy, after corn on the cob was eaten, the remaining kernels and bits were cut from the cob and dried. To make grits, the dried hominy was soaked in water until soft.

 

You CAN preserve food without canning - here's 10+ ways to do it!

Salted vegetables

Fresh vegetables were also sometimes preserved in dry salt (as opposed to brine) in a crock, although this depended on your access to salt (during medieval times, only the very wealthy had access to a lot of salt).

 

Nowadays, we have easy access to salt, so you can preserve your veggies in a salt concentration between 20 to 25 percent of the weight of your harvest (so 20 to 25 pounds salt per 100 pounds of food).

 

While this definitely prevents microbial growth, it also makes your vegetables very salty – if you preserve your harvest this way, be sure to soak the food in water before eating and adjust your recipe to make up for the extra salt in your vegetables.

 

To save their taste buds and make salt (which could be very expensive) last longer, people would instead preserve food in brine. The traditional ratio of salt to water to make a brine is 1 cup of salt to 1 gallon of water.

 

But the strength of this ratio depends on which salt you use – kosher is not equal to table salt in this case, and our ancestors didn’t have iodized salt to confuse the ratio.

 

It’s better to go with a strict weight – 10 ounces of salt per gallon of water.

 

Preserving Meat

 

Salt pork

Salting pork and other meats is an old fashioned method that’s not used today – and that’s a shame, because it works well to preserve AND season meat.

 

Using sugar, salt, and spices, pork could be submerged in the mixture and kept in a cool area for months – keeping the family fed while other sources of nutrition were scarce.

 

Cold Smoke

Cold smoking meat is a way of curing and preserving that we still use today – we’ve smoked many a slab of beef on our farm, and it’s delicious.

 

We’ve found that smoked meats take a lot longer to turn rancid or grow mold – but you need to COLD smoke (under 150 degrees, preferably around 100).

 

This is much easier achieved during the cool days of winter – which is why meat is traditionally harvested during fall and early winter.

 

Meat also should be first submerged in brine to help preserve it, help get moisture out of the cuts, and inhibit bacterial growth.

 

You can smoke meat, fish, cheese, vegetables, pretty much anything you can think of.

 

Using Fat to Store Meat

This process is called a confit, and has been used since ancient times to preserve fatty cuts of meat. When salted meat was cooked slowly in a large pot and at a low temperature for a long time, the meat would eventually give out the fat.

 

The meat/fat mixture was allowed to cool in a crock – the fat would rise to the top, creating a barrier between the meat and the outside world. Stored in a cool area, the food could be preserved for months during the winter.

 

Dry Salting Meat

Like vegetables, meat can be preserved simply by surrounding it in salt. Our ancestors would slice meat into strips, then stack them between layers of salt, like lasagna.

 

The crock or barrel was then kept in a cool area, and meat removed as the family needed it. The salt kept moisture, bacteria, and bugs away.  

 

Preserving Dairy

Dairy was (and is) most commonly preserved by fermenting into cheeses or yogurt. Yogurt would be consumed fairly quickly, while cheeses could be wrapped or preserved in wax, and kept in a cool area.

 

When making cheese, salt is added to the curds to reduce moisture and then the curds pressed. After waxing, cheese could be stored for years.

 

Soft cheeses such as feta could be stored and preserved in oil for months – as long as the cheese was submerged, bacterial growth is slowed down.

 

Preserving Eggs

Eggs would be preserved by waterglassing or by putting fats or mineral oils on the eggshells. In this article, we show you how to preserve eggs!

A Cluckin’ Good Time: Episode 1 [Live Stream]

A Cluckin’ Good Time: Episode 1 [Live Stream]

A Cluckin’ Good Time is a Facebook Live Stream Show that I’ve developed along with my friend, Mindy Young of Farm Fit Living.

 

We talk about homesteading, kitchen hacks, chickens, goats, livestock, and pretty much anything that we think of. Lots of audience participation!

 

A Cluckin’ Good Time airs Sunday nights at 7pm EST/6pm Central. You can view the show anytime – we leave it up on the FrugalChicken Facebook page for you to enjoy!

 

In this week’s episode, we discuss:

      • Our Thanksgiving plans (including Mindy’s recipe for simplifying pumpkin puree so it makes holiday pie making a snap)
      • Why it’s important to learn from every livestock experience
      • Our personal opinions on free ranging (and whether we free range our flocks)
      • Our funny holiday corn stories (with stories shared by our audience!)
      • My simple 2 step recipe for a homemade household cleaner using lemon and wild orange essential oils

Links we discuss:

Where to get my top essential oils for the homestead

Mindy’s new children’s book Sam The Beagle you can get for free on Amazon

I’d like to hear from you!

What was your favorite part of this episode of A Cluckin’ Good Time? Leave a comment below!

2015 Homestead Goals

CYMERA_20150127_200859We’ve had a few improvement ideas kicking around since we bought this homestead back in April. We’ve done all the work so far ourselves, trying to do it with as many free resources as possible. For 2015, I want to accomplish:

Finishing the horse barn and creating a wash bay
Erecting a pergola between the horse barn and the storage shed
Finishing the riding arena and edging it with bushes (incorporating fruit bushes as edible landscape)
Installing an orchard
Adding goats and sheep
Installing wheat grass in our pastures

I’m hoping that incorporating goats into our pastures will help with weed control. Two of our horses are small enough to be companions for the goats. We also would like a 4 acre plot cleared, and goats can help with that too.

Despite my husband’s eye rolling, building a methane digester is a big goal. I have to clean manure anyway, and I’m going to compost it anyway, so why not go the extra step and capture the methane? I’m not a 100% sure we will use it for more than cooking, since I plan to heat the barn with water. I’ve been reading about using ethanol for powering generators for off grid living, and that seems an easier route to go for electricity, and an adjustment to a generator we can easily do at home.

We’ve started gathering supplies for the aquaponic system. I’ll start off with goldfish, but eventually I want to have blue gill, tilapia, and catfish, along with fresh water prawns. I’m not a fan of catfish but my husband is. I’d prefer to only do tilapia and prawns, but we, at least at this point, can’t breed the tilapia because we do have winter here, so I will just buy fingerlings every year until we can consistently keep the water warm enough.

For the garden, I plan to erect 4-5 more raised beds and start on a separate garden for the chickens and pigs. Here’s what I plan to grow:

Early spring:
Radishes
Cabbage (lots because the pigs love it)
Greens like mustard, kale, romaine lettuce, some salad greens
Kohlrabi (this is new for me so I won’t do to much)
Bok choi
Peas

Summer:

Lots of potatoes
Bulb onions (we have green onions from the last owner so no need for those!)
Beans
Tomatoes
Parsnips
Carrots
Golden Bantam Corn (lots of corn for the animals)
Eggplants

Most of these are heirloom varieties. I’ve shopped the non-gmo catalogues, such as Baker Creek, Seed Savers, etc. I haven’t ordered my tomato seed yet because I spent a while deciding on varieties. I’ve decided to focus on heirloom varieties specific to my region, and Baker Creek has quite a few. Last year’s tomatoes got a mosaic virus, so I’ll be planting in a different area. I bought the plants from a feed store, so I’ll be avoiding that too.

What are your 2015 goals?

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Why Homestead: An Insider’s Look

Why Homestead: An Insider’s Look

 

Why homestead. This is the eternal question every homesteader must answer.

Why do we do it? Why reinvent the wheel of sorts, why put out the effort?

If you ask different homesteaders, “Why Homestead?” their answers are as varied as they are thematic. Usually, it’s something to do with getting back to a simpler life, reducing a carbon foot print, etc.

For me, the moment came when we suddenly were charged more for hay when a seller learned we moved here from an affluent part of the country and have horses.

In the horse world, people are decidedly more consumers than producers. Therefore, it must stand, we can afford to pay higher prices. That incident was the fundamental shift in my thinking. In short, I started homesteading because I was tired of getting ripped off.

The answer to “Why Homestead” became clear. I wanted to become more of a producer, and less of a consumer.

It hurts now to go to the grocery for meat because now I know sausage is usually the tougher parts of the pig and also the scraps left from the other cuts. Yet it still sells for $4/pound.

I can’t stand the cost of beef. We are on our way to producing our own pork. That’s some solace. We are further away from producing beef, mostly because of the cost.

I am working on the aquaponic system, which is slowly coming together. (Planning for 3 different types of fish and fresh water prawns eventually).

One thing I wasn’t prepared for, aside from the slow pace of things, was the financial side, which absolutely effects pace. I was prepared to build everything in a month, but that was just unrealistic. I also wasn’t prepared for the immense learning curve.

Things like plumbing to build my methane digester (I’m all about this methane digester, manure management is pretty much my life, and a part of homesteading I don’t see frequently addressed) and the aquaponic system.

Guess how much I knew about plumbing? It’s only slightly better now. 😉

The second reason I ventured into homesteading is after moving to rural America, after years of suburban/urban life, we couldn’t find any gourmet type food. Cheese especially. Our choices are cheap cheddars, or Swiss, made from who knows what additives. I’ve been dying for goats and sheep to start our own artisan cheeses.

Pretty much the only food you can get around here is super fried. And forget any Indian cuisine! (One of our staple cuisines. My husband had never even tried it before he met me, and neither had anyone in his family).

We decided to start our own chickens for meat, and not just eggs, when I read the USDA will allow chicken from China to be sold in the US. Now that I’ve studied butchering and taken apart whole chickens (we are still building our flock), I’m looking forward to harvesting from our own well-treated and well-cared for flock.

In addition to culling our excess roosters, we will add Cornish Crosses to our flock. While there might be more ethical or sustainable choices than that breed, I feel I will have an easier time emotionally butchering them since, if you let them live to long, it negatively effects the quality of their lives.

The two pigs we have here are for breeding, but their babies will be for butchering, or if they don’t breed, then they will be butchered, but it will be hard to do it.

I also like the whole idea of a closed-loop system, from everything from cooking to manure management. I like that after we fry chicken (I do like the occasional fried food!), we make gravy from the left over oil and chicken bits in the pan to make gravy (my husband likes biscuits and gravy for breakfast), and broth from the left over chicken and bones, which we use in rice, savory pancakes, etc in place of water to add extra flavor and protein.

Nothing goes to waste. Any leftovers go to the dog or the pigs.

We will install an orchard in the spring, and I’m looking at spots in the property for perennial beds (herbs, sunchokes and daikon radishes for livestock feed).

We are working on producing our own energy. We are actively looking at wind power, which seems an easier option for us than solar power, and at natural gas. With the wind we get and the animals, both are renewable sources of energy.

Since we have forested parts of our property, we are also looking at wood heating, which is a sustainable resource for us. I don’t mind staying tied to the grid for electric for now, but anything we can do to reduce our outputs, right?

We are looking at more sustainable heating options for next winter because of the cost of propane.

So, that’s why I homestead! Why do you homestead?

Why I homestead