What Color Eggs Will My Chickens Lay?

What Color Eggs Will My Chickens Lay?

Chicken eggs come in a variety of colors, and since we are looking at the whole process of a chick’s life, we may as well look at that awkward transition between the alpha state and the omega state, too. One of the biggest questions people have is “What color eggs will my chicken lay?” This is a big question, one that I’ve decided to answer today.

 

For me, the thrill of having chickens begins before they are even hatched, as chickens will need care and attention even from when they are still in their eggs. I don’t know about you, but I love eggs. Sure, they are incredibly useful in the kitchen, but if we’re hatching them, we’re not thinking food, are we? No, what I’m talking about is egg color. 

 

    1. The Surefire Way
    2. Disclaimer!
    3. Earlobe Color
    4. Easter Eggers
    5. Ayam Cemanis
    6. Silkies
    7. Summary

 

 

 

The Surefire Way Of Knowing What Color Eggs Your Chicken Will Lay

There are a few different ways you can sort of predict what color eggs your chicken will lay, but really? The only surefire way to know what color eggs your chickens will lay is by waiting until the egg is actually laid. Beyond that, there are some other ways that can probably help you figure out what color egg your hen will lay. 

 

Disclaimer!

Before we get started with this, I must say that there are always exceptions to everything I say here. Don’t message me or leave a comment below about how I’m wrong because a specific breed might not follow the conventions mentioned in this video. There are always going to be exceptions, and I will touch upon some of them. Please keep in mind that the information in this video is very generalized advice. 

 

Will Ear Lobe Color Tell You Egg Color?

From a conventional standpoint, if your chicken has white ear lobes, it will lay white eggs. If your chicken has red earlobes, it will lay brown eggs

 

Some very obvious exceptions to this, notably, are Easter Eggers, Silkies, and Ayam Cemanis – or any sort of chicken that is completely black. Silkies and Polish Bantams have blue ear lobes, but they can lay like a white egg or a cream-colored egg. Easter Eggers have red ear lobes and they can lay any sort of color eggs, from brown to cream to pink to blue to green to teal.

 

Exceptions To Ear Lobe Color

Easter Eggers

Easter Eggers aren’t a breed, exactly, and the colors of their eggs do have something to do with that chicken’s particular genetics. Because they are more like a hybrid, their eggs can be one of a massive variety of colors. With Easter Eggers, the idea that red ear lobes mean brown eggs doesn’t work in reality. 

 

An Easter Egger can lay brown, white, cream, blue, green, or even pink eggs. There’s no way to know until she actually starts laying.

 

One thing to note is that each Easter Egger hen can only lay one color throughout that hen’s lifetime. If you want a different color egg from your Easter Egger, you need to have another hen. 

 

Ayam Cemanis

Ayam Cemanis and chickens that have purely all black skin are another exception. Even though they’re completely black in color, and they have black ear lobes, Ayam Cemanis don’t lay black eggs; their eggs are cream-colored.

 

Silkies

Silkies also have black skin, but they’re not purely black because they do have the blue ear lobes. They also do not lay black eggs, but rather cream-colored eggs

 

There is to the best of my knowledge, while no chicken lays a black egg, emus do lay black eggs.

 

Summary

There you have it! While most chicken breeds are at least mostly predictable, there are the exceptions. Easter Eggers, especially, are tricky: the only way you are guaranteed to know what color egg will come out of your chicken is by seeing the egg that comes out of its vent. But this unexpected fluke of genetics is one of the exciting parts of raising your own chickens! When your chicks are ready to start laying, the anticipation of seeing the eggs will keep you on your toes. 

 

Got questions? Got comments? Got suggestions? Leave a comment below

 

Additional reading:

How often do chickens lay eggs?

When chickens stop laying eggs

Chicken breeds that lay colored eggs

Chicken Breeds Guide

Polish Chickens: Eggs, Colors, & More

Polish Chickens: Eggs, Colors, & More

The Polish chicken is a cute, quirky poultry friend that is a true delight to have in your flock.

 

With a natural talent to shine in the coop or shows, the Polish chicken has many qualities that can make it a good addition to your flock.

 

They’re also adorable, friendly, full of personality, and make great companions. In this article, you’ll discover everything you need to know about the Polish chicken.

 

Polish Chicken Personalities

What Are Polish Chickens Like?

Polish chickens are quirky, funny creatures that are full of personality and love to be held.

 

They’re best known for the tufts of feathers on their head, lovingly referred to by chicken owners as their “pom pom.”

 

This chicken breed is a stunning mix of white, brown, and black making it a real head turner. The silver laced polish varieties are black and white chickens.

 

They’re great for children since they’re not aggressive, like being held, and are friendly. Because of their size and the crest of feathers (which can cover their eyes and make it hard for them to see), they can be a little skittish around very fast movement.

 

But with consistent handling and treats like black soldier fly larvae, your Polish chickens will welcome your visits!

 

What Are Polish Chickens Used For? (What Is The Use Of The Polish Breed?)

Polish chickens are largely kept for ornamental reasons – because they’re pretty and friendly. They’re also great for children because they like to be held and enjoy human companionship. Polish chickens are fair egg layers, and you can expect 2-3 eggs per week (assuming the hen’s diet is adequate. You can learn more about what chickens eat here and high quality alternative feeds here.)

 

Quick Facts about Polish Chickens:

Appearance Varieties Eggs Personality
Feather crest on head White Crested Black White Friendly
4 toes Golden laced Lay 2-3x per week Quiet in coop
~6 pounds Buff laced ~100 eggs per year Good for children
V-comb, small wattles Silver laced Medium sized Likes treats & toys

Appearance

Polish chickens have 4 toes, a crest of feathers on their head that often covers their eyes, and have a calm appearance. The hens do not have prominent wattles or combs, and both sexes have a v-shaped comb.

 

Polish chicken breed and color varieties:

  • Non-Bearded White Crested Black
  • Non-Bearded Golden
  • Non-Bearded Silver
  • Non-Bearded White
  • Bearded Golden
  • Bearded Silver
  • Bearded White
  • Bearded Buff Laced
  • Non-Bearded Buff Laced
  • Non-Bearded White Crested Blue

 

At most major hatcheries, you’ll find most of these types. The most popular Polish chicken varieties are:

  • Silver laced
  • Buff laced
  • White crested black
  • Golden laced

 

The laced chickens are popular because their feathers are very beautiful, and they’re a colorful addition to any flock. The white crested black variety are prized because they’re black chickens with a contrasting white crest – a real head turner!

 

You can also find “frizzled” variants (the feathers look messy and turn upward, instead of lay neatly against their bodies.). You can learn more about frizzles here.

 

It’s important to note that Polish chickens aren’t very cold hardy, but they’re heat tolerant. So, if you live in a cold area, you will need to pay special attention to them during the cold days. In the summer, it’s also important to note they could get heat stroke – so providing cool, fresh water at all times is critical.

 

Is A Polish Chicken A Bantam?

While there’s full size Polish chickens, there’s also Polish bantams available (you can read more about how to raise bantams here – because of their size, they have some special needs to keep them safe from chicken predators.

 

Full size Polish roosters weigh about 6 lbs and hens weigh 4.5 lbs. The bantam varieties weigh about 2-3 pounds.

 

They’re relatively good fliers, although they’re unlikely to “fly the coop” and wander off. Because of their crest of feathers, they can’t see very well, so they usually stick close to home.

 

Do Polish Chickens Have 5 Toes?

Polish chickens have only 4 toes. Only:

chickens have 5 toes. You can learn about these chicken breeds here.

 

Are Polish Chickens Aggressive?

Not usually. Polish chickens are easy going, and due to their friendly natures, they enjoy human company.

 

What Age Do Polish Roosters Crow?

The age a rooster will first crow varies on the breed, but in general they typically will begin crowing at about four or five months of age, some late bloomers even at 8 months.

 

Eggs

Do Polish Chickens Lay Eggs?

The Polish chicken is not reliable egg layers although they do lay a good number of around 200 medium to large sized eggs/year. Although it does take them a while to get into the swing of laying, but once they do it comes consistently.

 

Despite popular myth, you don’t need a rooster for your hens to lay eggs, although it’s not a bad idea to keep one to protect your hens.

 

How Many Eggs Do Polish Chickens Lay?

Polish chicken hens aren’t great layers – you can expect 2-3 eggs per week. This also depends on her diet (a poor diet can cause chickens to stop laying eggs. It’s best to stick with a 16% layer feed and always offer a calcium supplement. You can learn more about egg laying, including how often chickens lay eggs, here.

 

What Color Eggs Do Polish Chickens Lay?

Polish chickens lay white eggs.

 

Are Polish Chickens Good Layers?

Since this chicken is often used for ornamental purposes their egg laying ability varies on the breed. Polish are sweet natured and beautiful exhibition birds but not reliable egg layers.

 

How Many Eggs Does A Polish Chicken Lay?

Polish chickens lay around 200 white eggs per year.

 

What Age Do Polish Chickens Lay Eggs?

Most Polish hens start laying eggs at about 5 months of age, which is a bit earlier than other popular breeds like Cochins, Speckled Sussex, or Buff Orpingtons. This will depend on her diet and the season – if she turns 6 months old during the winter, she might not lay until spring. Most chickens need 12-14 hours of light a day to lay eggs.

 

Hatching Chicks

Are Polish Chickens Broody?

While any chicken can go broody (even roosters, oddly enough), Polish chickens aren’t bred for their mothering abilities. So, they don’t tend to go broody.

 

How Long Do Polish Chickens Take To Hatch?

Like other breeds, you should expect it to take 21 days for your chicks to hatch. You can learn more about hatching chicks here and discover the incubators I recommend here.

 

Once the chicks hatch, offer a high-quality 18% protein chick starter feed.

Caring For Your Polish Chicken

Full size chickens and the bantam versions have similar needs:

  • A safe coop (you can learn how to build a predator-safe coop here)
  • A high-quality feed (here’s the feed I recommend)
  • Clean water (get my waterer recommendations here)
  • Entertainment, such as a chicken swing

 

To keep predators and pests out of your coop, it’s best to use a chicken feeder that’s easy to clean and/or will automatically close. You can check out the chicken feeders I recommend here. 

 

For all chicken breeds, hardware cloth is a good option to keep them safe – you can learn more about chicken wire here and discover which option is best for your situation here.

 

Do Polish Hens Have Spurs?

No, they don’t. Only the roosters have spurs.

 

Where Are Polish Chickens From?

The origins of this breed is a bit unclear, however,  there are several anecdotes saying that the bird came from Europe. The most notable story is that in 1736, the King of Poland was dethroned and fled to France bringing with him his beloved Polish chickens.

 

They were well loved by the French aristocracy and from then on their future was assured. The Polish chicken traveled from Continental Europe to England (1700’s) and eventually finding its way to the USA in 1830-1840.


Where To Buy Polish Chickens?

Most major hatcheries carry Polish chicks, including:

  • Cackle Hatchery (You can read our review of Cackle Hatchery here.)
  • Meyer Hatchery
  • Murray McMurray
  • Ideal Poultry
  • Stromberg Chickens

 

You might also be able to find Polish chickens at farm stores or local breeders. 

 

 

Silkie Chickens: Pet Facts & Fiction

Silkie Chickens: Pet Facts & Fiction

Who doesn’t want to own Silkie chickens? They’re fun, sweet-natured, and they make you breakfast! In short, they’re the perfect pet.

 

Yep – you can definitely keep chickens as pets, and Silkies make GREAT pets, especially for households with children. I also know MANY seniors who keep Silkies because they’re easier to care for than a dog, and they’re great company.

 

For special needs children, Silkies can also be a great pet because:

 

  • They’re quiet
  • Submit to being held on laps (while other breeds of chickens will flap and squawk)
  • They look like fluffy balls straight out of a Dr. Seuss story, and
  • Their feathers are soft to touch – great for children with sensory issues.

 

In this article, you’ll find all the Silkie chickens information and facts you need to help you decide if you want to add them to your flock.

Silkie chicken pet facts and fiction
 

 

Silkie Chickens Information & Breed Characteristics

What are Silkie chickens?

 

Where do Silkies originate from?

Silkies are an ancient breed that has their origins in Asia, most likely in China. Because of their black skin, their Chinese language name is wu gu ji, which means “black-boned chicken.”

Marco Polo was the first Westerner to write about Silkies – and in his books about his travels on the Asian continent in the 1200’s, he referred to them as a “furry chicken.”  

Similarly, Renaissance writer Ulisse Aldrovandi referred to Silkie chickens as “wool-bearing chickens” and “clothed with hair like that of a black cat.”

As you can see, Silkies have made quite an impression on humans for centuries!

 

Why are they called Silkies?

They’re called Silkies because their feathers resemble the down on chicks – and it feels “silky.”

 

What do Silkies look like?

How big do Silkies get?

Silkies weigh about 2-3 pounds and are about the size of a Chihuahua dog.

 

What’s the Silkie breed standard?

When you think of Silkies, you probably think of the bantam size – and according to the American Standard of Perfection, the perfect size for a silkie chicken hen is about 2 pounds.

 

The American Standard of Perfection has very specific requirements for Silkies. The comb and wattles should be a “deep mulberry, approaching black” with a “Leaden blue” beak. The legs of both hens and roosters should be straight with no more or less than 5 toes.

 

What are their feathers like?

Funky feathers like fluff balls of joy! Silkies are a bit different than other chickens. Yes, the hens lay eggs, but did you know they also don’t have “normal” feathers like other backyard chickens?

Their feathers are similar to down, and it’s a bit like silk – hence the name “Silkie.” Because of their feathers, Silkie chickens can’t fly, but they do love to run for a treat!

Their feathers are structured different than other chicken feathers – they do not have barbicels, so they do not have the physical structure needed to allow Silkies to fly.

If you get Silkies for sale as chicks, you’ll love how they develop “Mohawks” when they turn into teenagers! It takes a while for the down to grow out to its full length, so there’s some lovably awkward stages!

 

Do Silkies have black skin?

Silkies are also well known for their skin – while most other chicken breeds (such as Speckled Sussex and Araucana chickens) have white skin, Silkies have black or even blue skin.

You might notice your silkies have blue skin, particularly on their ears! As they mature, you’ll also notice their combs and wattles have a reddish hue to them.

 

How high can Silkies jump?

Because they don’t really fly, silkies can’t roost like other chickens. So, they can only jump a couple feet at a time.

Do silkies roost? Well, they DO enjoy sleeping off the ground, even if they can’t roost up high.

You’ll want to give your silkies an easy way to get higher. We put bales of hay in our coop for the silkies to jump up on – and they can get 5-6 feet in the air easily.

How many toes do Silkies have?

Unlike other chickens, Silkies have an extra 1 or two toes on their feet! (Just like a polydactyl cat!)

The scientific reason is because Silkies have a genetic mutation that allows them to grow the extra toes. I’m not sure if it has much purpose out in the “real world” of the coop, but they sure do look cool!

 

What colors are Silkies?

Silkie chickens come in all sorts of colors, such as black, blue, buff, grey, partridge, white, cuckoo, lavender, red, and splash.

While the American Standard of Perfection doesn’t recognize all these colors, you should choose the color that’s right for you – especially if your keeping Silkie chickens as pets. After all, color doesn’t matter as much as temperament!

There’s also bearded Silkie chickens – which have an extra adorable tuft of feathers!

Silkie chicken pet facts for new owners

Do Silkies have feathered feet?

Yes, they do – and it’s part of their charm! In the United States, silkies are ornamental birds, so they’re bred to grow feathers on their feet. Most owners love it!

 

What age do Silkie chickens start crowing? Do Silkies crow?

If your silkie is a rooster, he should start crowing at about 7 months. However, not all silkies will crow. It depends on the individual chicken.

 

Our silkie roosters don’t crow or make much noise at all – which makes them ideal for suburban households that don’t want to disturb their neighbors.

What are Silkie chickens like as pets?

Do they make good pets?

Silkies make GREAT pets, especially for households with children. I also know MANY seniors who keep Silkies because they’re easier to care for than a dog, and they’re great company.

 

Are Silkies good with children?

YES! Silkies are quiet birds who enjoy human company. They’re more willing to be held than other chickens and will put up with small children and fast movements more than other breeds.

 

You can see our chicken breeds for children recommendations here.

 

Why do people keep them as pets?

Silkies can also be a great pet because:

  • They’re quiet
  • Submit to being held on laps (while other breeds of chickens will flap and squawk)
  • They look like fluffy balls straight out of a Dr. Seuss story, and
  • Their feathers are soft to touch – great for children with sensory issues

 

Are Silkies friendly?

Yes, especially if raised as pets from birth. They’re quiet, and when they’ve bonded to their human, they often follow their owners around. Many seniors keep silkies because they’re friendlier than other chicken breeds and enjoy being around their humans.

 

How long do Silkie chickens live for?

Silkies, like other chickens, can live for 4-8 years, when kept in ideal conditions and fed correctly.

 

To give your silkie the best quality of life, you should keep them in a coop with fresh water and plenty of high quality feed.  You should also give your pet chicken medical care when needed and herbal supplements to support her health.

 

Buying Silkies

How much is a Silkie chicken worth?

Whatever someone will pay for it! Most Silkie chicks that are sold as pets cost less than $5 – and you might find them at your local farm store for less.

 

Silkies that are show quality might cost hundreds of dollars, while ones hatched at a high quality breeder might cost less.

 

Where can I buy Silkie chickens?

Hatcheries, your local farm store, or private breeders. See our list here of where to buy chickens.

 

When you buy them, look for the extra toe – that’s a pretty good indicator the chicken actually is a Silkie. You should also bring a knowledgeable friend who can help you select chicks that appear healthy.

 

We’ve had good luck finding them at farm stores like Tractor Supply.

 

General Care

How long do Silkie chickens need a heat lamp?

Approximately 16 weeks of age. Like other chicks, Silkies need their brooders to be between 90-95 degrees for their first week of life (and reduce the temperature by 5 degrees every week.)

 

If it’s warm in your area, your Silkies should be fine once they can handle temperatures of 70 degrees.

 

If it’s cold, and your Silkies are under 16 weeks of age, you might need to supplement with a heat source until they’re older. We don’t recommend heat LAMPS because they can cause fires. We’ve used heating pads and been okay.

 

Do Silkie chickens need a heat lamp during winter?

Not generally, although this will depend on how cold your area gets. They’re generally fine in temperatures as low as 0 degrees.

 

In colder temperatures, you might have to provide a heat source. If you have just a couple, the easiest and safest way to ensure they’re warm is to bring them in at night. They’ll be fine in a dog crate.

 

Heat lamps are dangerous and can ignite a fire, so we don’t recommend them.

 

Can Silkies stand cold temperatures? Are Silkie chickens cold hardy?

One thing to watch out for is caring for Silkie chickens in winter – because they don’t have regular feathers, they can’t “fluff” them like other chickens to keep warm.

 

Just keep an eye on your fluffy butts and if they seem cold (or if it’s going to be very cold in your area), give them a way to stay warm.

 

They’re generally fine in temperatures as low as 0 degrees. It’s extremely important to make sure your silkies aren’t outside when it’s cold and wet – in freezing rain, for example.

 

Because their feathers are finer, they won’t stay as warm as other chickens. Freezing rain, sleet, or snow can turn deadly for your Silkies – so in inclement weather, leave them in their coop.

 

Do Silkies get along with chickens?

Yes – even though they look different, Silkies are quiet flock members, and get along well with other chickens.

 

Because they’re docile, you might find your Silkies are picked on more than your other flock members – just keep an eye out, and separate if any issues arise.

 

How do you introduce Silkies to an existing flock?

Just like you would any other chicken – by letting established flock members see their new friend without touching the Silkie.

 

Then, after 48-72 hours, you can try to integrate the Silkie with the rest of your flock.

 

You still might see squabbles, but as long as everyone is healthy and not hurt, they will stop in a couple days.

Feeding Silkies

What do you feed Silkies?

Silkies eat the same feed as regular chickens – a high-quality layer feed (for hens) or a high quality chick starter (for baby chicks). They don’t need any special feeds.

 

For treats, you can feed Silkies mealworms, herbs, kitchen scraps, leafy greens, black soldier fly larvae, or river shrimp.

 

Do they eat a lot?

Silkies are smaller chickens, and they eat less than standard size breeds. They still should be fed about 1-2 cups of feed daily – and you can feed them leafy greens, black soldier fly larvae, herbs, mealworms, and other treats to boost their diet. This is also a great way to bond with your silkies!

 

Silkie health issues

You might read on the internet that Silkies are more disease prone than other breeds and you should get your Silkie chickens vaccinated – I have not experienced this, and I would venture to say that Silkies are a hardy breed.

 

Silkie Eggs

What color eggs do Silkies lay?

They lay off white eggs or cream colored eggs.

 

How many eggs do Silkie chickens lay? Do they edible eggs?

They lay 3-4 times a week – so they’re not the champion layers of the backyard chicken world, but they have other qualities to make up for it!

 

Do Silkies like to hatch eggs?

Yes! Many people keep silkies because the hens “go broody” and want to hatch eggs – any eggs!

They’re wonderful pets that look funny and make great companion chickens for children and adults. They’re friendly, calm, and love human company….that is, unless they’ve decided to hatch eggs!

Yes, Silkies tend to “go broody” more than other breeds, and many people keep this breed of chicken specifically to incubate eggs on their farm. Now, this isn’t a guarantee your hen will want to hatch chicken eggs!

 

How many eggs can a Silkie hen sit on?

As many as she can fit under her! The amount will depend on the size of your fluffy butt.

Hens prefer to sit on an odd number of eggs – it’s not unheard of to see silkie chickens sitting on 11 or 13 eggs!

12 Types Of Chickens Smart Women Keep As Pets

12 Types Of Chickens Smart Women Keep As Pets

If you’re here, I’m pretty sure you’re probably raising certain types of chickens for their eggs.

 

Raising chicken breeds for eggs is usually why people get into chickens in the first place! Then, very quickly, you realize it’s a lot of fun to own these weird little cluckers and each of the types of chickens has a distinct personality…….and you fall in love.

 

Some types of chickens are great chicken breeds for eggs, some are good for meat, and some types of chickens are perfect as pets. And there are some chicken breeds you need in your life just because they’re fun and quirky (and you can put bows on them).

 

In this article, we’re going to show you the best types of chickens that are perfect as pets!

 

Are you a backyard chicken beginner and not sure which hens will look super cute in your coop? Here's 12 types of chickens to give you some ideas!

 

Chicken breeds for eggs

Marans

Marans, a type of chicken which originated in France, can lay anything from a light brown egg to the coveted chocolate-colored eggs (said to be the best in the world).

 

The first few eggs a marans hen lays can be darker than subsequent ones, unlike other chicken breeds. Chart your flocks egg colors to see if her eggs stay the same shade! There are several different types of marans chickens, including Black Copper, Blue Copper, Cuckoo, and Wheaton.

 

Production Reds

This type of chicken isn’t really a breed, but rather a modern strain, created for high egg production. They lay very consistently, and some will even lay throughout winter.

 

Plymouth Rock Chickens

This is an old chicken breed that’s been raised in the United States for hundreds of years. Plymouth Rock chickens are a great chicken breed for eggs. They lay about 280 eggs a year and the roosters are great guardians and protectors.

Are you a backyard chicken beginner and not sure which hens will look super cute in your coop? Here's 12 types of chickens to give you some ideas!

Easter Eggers

Easter eggers are not breeds of chickens, but rather a hybrid between chickens carrying the blue laying gene and another breed, such as New Hampshire Chickens.

 

If you’re looking for a healthy types of chickens that lay all sorts of colored eggs, then definitely raise Easter eggers, but know the color of the eggs isn’t guaranteed, since they don’t breed true.

 

Types of chickens for pets & children

Silkies

Out of all the types of chickens, Silkies are best known for their even, friendly temperaments, and some silkies are even used as therapy chickens for special-needs children because they’re so good with people.

 

Silkies are adorable with fluffy feathers and 5 toes on their feet. Adult males get around 4 pounds. Hens go broody easily, and they are the types of chickens that will hatch eggs other than their own.

 

Rhode Island Reds

Rhode Island Reds is one of the oldest types of heritage chickens in America. There are both industrial strains of Rhode Island Reds, bred for egg production as well as the heritage strains, which are larger.

 

They’re docile and friendly types of chickens, and easily trained to be held in your lap. Rhode Island Reds also happen to be an excellent chicken breed for eggs, and they can produce about 280 eggs each year!

 

Ameraucanas

Ameraucanas are great pet types of chickens because they lay beautiful blue eggs and are small and look adorable.  An American breed, Ameraucanas were developed intentionally to preserve the blue egg laying gene of the Araucana (which is the only type of chickens evolved to carry the blue egg laying gene), but to eliminate the some of the lethal genetics of the Araucana breed.


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Beautiful types of chickens

Hamburg

Hamburg chickens are beautiful with black and white feathers. They are great chicken breeds for eggs, and you can get either full sized or bantam types.

 

Polish Bantams

These types of chickens look a bit like cartoon characters with big tufts of feathers on their heads (they look like pom poms!) Polish bantams come in a variety of colors, and they are calm and docile. I mean, who wouldn’t love looking at these cluckers all day?

 

Are you a backyard chicken beginner and not sure which hens will look super cute in your coop? Here's 12 types of chickens to give you some ideas!

 

Lavender Orpington

This breed is becoming more popular because…well…..lavender. They’re not really purple, although some owners disagree! They’re a type of orpington, which are known for being great layers. They’re also great companions!

 

Are you a backyard chicken beginner and not sure which hens will look super cute in your coop? Here's 12 types of chickens to give you some ideas!

 

Sultans

Sultans are one of several heritage chicken breeds that are critically endangered. They were bred in Turkey as ornamental birds for the gardens of the Sultan (in fact, their actual name is Serai Taook, which in Turkish means Sultan’s Fowl.) They’re very pretty chickens, with tufts of feathers on their heads and feathered feet.

 

Frizzles

How neat are these Frizzles chickens? Their curled feathers are a genetic trait, and are certainly a show stopper! These types of chickens are docile and happily will sit on eggs for you when they’re not strutting around your yard!

 

Brahmas

These types of chickens are super cool – they have black and white feathers, and tufts of feathers on their feet. They’re docile and happy to hang out on your lap! Best of all, you can get them as average sized chickens, or as large as turkeys! How cool would a huge rooster like this be in your backyard!

 

Beginner backyard chicken owner? Here's 12 super cute types of chickens that'll look great in your coop!

 

For Further Reading On Various Types of Chickens:

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How Different Colored Eggs Are Formed (And Why All Eggs Are Either White Or Blue)

How Different Colored Eggs Are Formed (And Why All Eggs Are Either White Or Blue)

Do you want different colored eggs in your morning egg basket? Who doesn’t?

I have often been emailed by people asking: “Why are chicken eggs different colors?” So let’s talk about different chicken egg colors.

 

Harvesting different colored eggs is one of the best parts of chicken ownership, and I personally keep certain breeds, such as Easter Eggers and Blue Copper Marans, on our homestead just so I can harvest different colored eggs.

 

It’s wonderfully exciting to check the coop only to find a blue, green, pink, or dark brown egg in the hens’ favorite nest (because they all have to pile into the same nesting box!).

 

In fact, I love gathering different colored eggs so much that the only egg color we don’t have on the homestead is white!


Have you ever wondered why chicken eggs come in different colors?

 

Well, I have an answer for you!

 

Curious about how different colored eggs are made? Do you know why all eggs are either truly white or blue? In this article, you'll learn how chickens make different colored eggs, how their color is determined, and why every egg out there is either blue or white. From FrugalChicken.

 

While most eggs start off as white as the yolk is encased in a shell and travels down the oviduct, according to the University of Kentucky, their final color is based on the chicken’s genetics.

 

In most cases, only once the egg hits the uterus does it actually become colored.

 

Except…

 

Unless your hen is an Ameraucana, Araucana, or an Easter Egger that lays blue eggs.

 

Why’s that?

 

These two breeds use the pigment oocyanin to color their egg shells blue, and as the pigment is deposited on the egg as it travels through the oviduct, it permeates the egg.

 

Unlike other pigments, oocyanin covers eggs earlier in the shell-making process. This results in the interior and exterior of the egg being the same blue color, the University of Michigan found.

 

With olive eggers and Easter Eggers that lay different colored eggs, a brown pigment called protoporphyrin overlays a blue shell, which results in a green egg, and a blue interior egg shell.

 

So what about the rest of the chicken breeds that lay different colored eggs?

 

Their interiors are white, and that’s because chickens that lay brown tinted eggs deposit the protoporphyrin on the eggs much later in the shell forming process than oocyanin.

Curious about how different colored eggs are made? Do you know why all eggs are either truly white or blue? In this article, you'll learn how chickens make different colored eggs, how their color is determined, and why every egg out there is either blue or white. From FrugalChicken.

 

Because of this, protoporphyrin does not penetrate the interior of the egg, but colors only the surface of the egg, leaving the interior white.

 

The breed of your chicken will determine how her eggs are colored, whether they are brown, white, green, etc., but her individual genetics will determine the exact shade.

 

In case you don’t know, chickens, like humans, are born with millions of eggs in her ovaries, but she will only lay a fraction of those eggs in her lifetime.

 

After the egg is released, which is a hormonal response, it takes 26 hours to actually be laid, and during that time, it goes on a journey through her oviduct. Most of that time is spent forming the egg shell.

 

Only in the last few hours before the egg is laid does the pigment get added, creating the different colored eggs we find in our coops.

 

Pretty exciting stuff, don’t you think?

 

So…

Which chicken breeds lay different colored eggs?

 

While there’s a lot of chicken breeds that will lay different colored eggs, a short list of the most colorful eggs include:

 

  • Marans for dark chocolate colored 
  • Easter Eggers for green, blue, or pink 
  • Olive Eggers (a cross between a brown layer and a blue layer) for dark green 
  • Araucanas for blue 
  • Ameraucanas for blue (although Ameraucana and Araucana are referred to interchangeably, a true Araucana is a descendent of the chickens imported Chile to America in the 1920s).
Curious about how different colored eggs are made? Do you know why all eggs are either truly white or blue? In this article, you'll learn how chickens make different colored eggs, how their color is determined, and why every egg out there is either blue or white. From FrugalChicken.

“Araucana hen showing ear tufts” by User:Anne Cushing – Own work. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

What about eggs that are speckled or with different shades?

 

While these eggs are usually completely normal, they can also be abnormal chicken eggs, and an indication something is not right with your hen.

 

Sometimes her diet can be off, or she might be experiencing some sort of stress like heat stress.

 

Speckles usually are normal, and are a welcome, and often beautiful, change!

Curious about how to tell if your chickens will lay different colored eggs other than white?

 

An interesting tip is to look at the chicken’s ear lobes.

 

Typically a chicken with white ear lobes will produce white eggs, while those with red earlobes will produce brown or different colored eggs.

 

Do the different colors impact the flavor or the health value of the eggs?

 

In short, nope.

 

Believe it or not, this is a common question I get from people unfamiliar with chickens.

 

A study by the University of Kansas showed that although brown eggs are more popular in grocery stores because they’re perceived as healthier, in fact the different colors in an egg has nothing to do with how healthy they are.

 

Different colored eggs and white ones have the exact same amount of cholesterol in them.

 

So eat away at those different colored eggs and don’t worry about whether they’re more or less nutritious for you (your hen’s diet actually determines how healthy her eggs are for you.)

Curious about how different colored eggs are made? Do you know why all eggs are either truly white or blue? In this article, you'll learn how chickens make different colored eggs, how their color is determined, and why every egg out there is either blue or white. From FrugalChicken.

I’d like to hear from you!

 

Which different colored eggs are your favorite? Which chicken breeds do you keep for colored eggs (I personally love Easter egger egg colors)? Email me at [email protected] or comment below!

More Egg Articles:


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