What To Buy At The Farmer’s Market This Month: Thanksgiving Edition

What To Buy At The Farmer’s Market This Month: Thanksgiving Edition

Can you believe that it’s almost November? I feel like this year has flown past!

Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday and I am so excited for this year! I love to find seasonal foods at my local farmer’s market for Thanksgiving. Eating local food tastes sooo much better and that makes it perfect for Thanksgiving!

In my area it’s still 80 degrees (can you believe it? ugh) so the growing season is a little bit longer here. But I know for many of you, especially those of you who live further north, the farmer’s market pickings are getting slim in November.

Because of the variety of climates in the United States this is farmer’s market guide is pretty general. If you want to know exactly what’s in season in your area you can head over to The Seasonal Food Guide. I love this website because you can put in your zip code and know exactly what’s in season throughout the year in your area!

So let’s get started! Here’s what you should be looking for at the farmer’s market in November!

Apples

I’ve said it many times before, but I LOVE fresh apples. And fresh apples are perfect for making apple pie for Thanksgiving! In my opinion, there’s nothing better than homemade apple pie. You can check out my favorite homemade pie recipes here: Homemade Pie Recipes For The Holidays

You can also use fresh apples to make homemade apple cider vinegar! I have a guide for how to make apple cider vinegar here!

Mint

If you’re lucky you might be able to find some fresh mint at your local farmer’s market this month. It’s still in season in my area at the beginning of November, so keep an eye out for it! Having mint around during Thanksgiving is a must have for me because mint soothes upset tummies. I like to chew on the leaves, or I’ll make mint tea if I have an upset stomach (from eating too much!)

Plus mint has tons of benefits for your chickens! I use dried peppermint in my hens’ nesting boxes! You can get dried peppermint in my shop here: Dried peppermint 

Potatoes

If you’re lucky you might still be able to find some local potatoes for your Thanksgiving mashed potatoes. Since potatoes are fairly easy to store long term you can usually find farmers who have stored their crop from earlier in the season. When I lived further north I would go to a local farmer who stored potatoes in a massive root cellar! It was awesome because you could get local potatoes year round!

Check out my favorite recipe for Southern Style Mashed Potatoes and Gravy that you can make in your instant pot!

Sweet Potatoes

Yum! I love sweet potatoes! And good thing they’re in season in November, so you can make candied yams for Thanksgiving! This recipe for candied yams looks delicious (This recipe does call for sweet potatoes, not yams. Typically in the U.S. the words sweet potatoes and yams are used almost interchangeably which can be confusing!)

You can also try my favorite recipe for Southern Style Sweet Potatoes!

Winter Squash

I’m really looking forward to trying some recipes with winter squash this year! There are so many varieties of winter squash (spaghetti, acorn, butternut etc.) and I’m really looking forward to trying some out!

Some recipes I’m dying to try this year are:

Pumpkin

There are still fresh local pumpkins hanging around after Halloween, I promise! I love using fresh pumpkin to make pumpkin puree and pumpkin spice because it’s perfect for the holidays! You can find my recipe here: Pumpkin Puree & Pumpkin Spice. But my favorite thing to do with fresh pumpkin is make pumpkin pie! You can check out my favorite holiday pie recipes right here!

Carrots

Where I live, fresh carrots start showing up in October & November (since summers are so hot!) This recipe for Maple Brown Sugar Glazed Carrots would be the perfect side dish for Thanksgiving!

Mustard Greens

Yum! Mustard greens are perfect for salads and they would be great for a Thanksgiving side dish. Check out this recipe for Sautéed Mustard Greens With Garlic and Lemon!

Thyme

I love fresh thyme! Typically November is the last month there’s fresh thyme at the farmer’s market, so I’m going to enjoy it while I can! I just made a recipe for meatball orzo stew tonight for dinner, and the best part was it featured fresh thyme! You can find the recipe here: Slow cooker meatball orzo stew.

Well that’s all folks! If you’re looking for Thanksgiving décor ideas for your home, I’ve got your covered! Head over to this article here for my favorite fall themed décor! What are you going to buy at the farmer’s market this month?

 

Pumpkin Puree & Pumpkin Pie Spice Tutorial

Pumpkin Puree & Pumpkin Pie Spice Tutorial

Now is the time of year that I get superpsyched – time to make pumpkin puree!

I get excited for the post-Halloween time not just because I can make pumpkin puree, but because those round orange squash become super cheap at the store – which means I can feed pumpkin to my chickens and pigs for a very low price.

 

But back to pumpkin puree (which you can feed to chickens too, by the way).

 

Pumpkin puree is really easy to make, and you won’t believe how much better it tastes than the stuff in the cans. 

 

And of course, as homesteaders, we like buying items we can use in multiple ways, and pumpkin is no different. 

 

Grab some pumpkin and let's make pumpkin puree! It's a versatile pantry staple, and I've even thrown in a pumpkin spice recipe to get you started. From FrugalChicken

 

In addition to pumpkin puree, you’ll also have seeds for toasting and the remaining guts to feed your chickens.

 

This method for making pumpkin puree works also for other squashes, like Hubbard, you name it, so feel free to become a puree making fool this fall!

 

So, let’s look at how to make pumpkin puree for pies, soups, or whatever your imagination can think of!

 

 

Grab some pumpkin and let's make pumpkin puree! It's a versatile pantry staple, and I've even thrown in a pumpkin spice recipe to get you started. From FrugalChicken

How to make pumpkin puree

 

For this recipe, we’ll just use sugar pumpkins (also called a pie pumpkins) – they’re the most commonly used for homemade pumpkin puree, and easily found at any market in the fall.

 

They’re called sugar pumpkins for a reason: They’re the best for baking and making pumpkin puree

 

Typically, they’re 6-8 inches in diameter, which is an easy size to lift and cut up without getting too overwhelmed, and you can expect about 16 oz of pumpkin puree.

 

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees (as you know, food should not ever be put in a cold oven or on a cold pan if you plan to roast, so pre-heating is a very important step.)

Grab some pumpkin and let's make pumpkin puree! It's a versatile pantry staple, and I've even thrown in a pumpkin spice recipe to get you started. From FrugalChicken

Remove the guts of the pumpkin, set aside to remove the seeds for roasting later.

 

Slice up your pumpkin into 1 inch size pieces. 

 

Grab some pumpkin and let's make pumpkin puree! It's a versatile pantry staple, and I've even thrown in a pumpkin spice recipe to get you started. From FrugalChicken

 

Place in a roasting pan that already has 1/2″ of water in it. The water is necessary to keep the pumpkin from burning.

 

Cook until done, which should be about 45 minutes. Pierce the pumpkin with a fork or knife to check if it’s done – if it slides right off, it’s ready!

 

Remove the pumpkin from the oven, and allow to cool.

 

Once the pumpkin is cool, scoop the flesh away from the peel. (The pumpkin peel should be relatively soft, so feel free to give it to your animals, or compost).

 

Blend the remaining flesh in your blender until a puree is formed. 

 

Grab some pumpkin and let's make pumpkin puree! It's a versatile pantry staple, and I've even thrown in a pumpkin spice recipe to get you started. From FrugalChicken

 

You can use the puree right away in your favorite recipe, or store in the fridge for 2 days.

 

If you’re not going to use your puree right away, store it in the freezer.

 

You can also freeze enough pumpkin puree to last the year – just make sure to hit the sales after Halloween to grab pumpkin at a cheap price.

 

Now that we’ve made pumpkin puree…

Let’s talk about spices.

 

Making your own pumpkin pie spice is as simple as…well…making pumpkin puree.

 

Grab some pumpkin and let's make pumpkin puree! It's a versatile pantry staple, and I've even thrown in a pumpkin spice recipe to get you started. From FrugalChicken

 

Grab the following (if you’re not sure where to buy fresh spices, we’ll talk about that in a minute):

Homemade Pumpkin Pie Spice

1 tbsp + 1 tsp ground cinnamon

2 tsp ground ginger

1/2 tsp all spice

1 star anise pod, ground

1/2 tsp nutmeg

 

Combine in a mason jar to store, or just immediately with any recipe using your pumpkin puree.

 

Now that wasn’t hard, was it?

 

Okay, as promised, here’s where to buy your fresh spices:

 

I’d like to hear from you!

How do you think you’ll use pumpkin puree this season? How about the spice? Contact me at [email protected] or comment below!