Tick Kit: How To Make A Homemade Tick Kit

Tick Kit: How To Make A Homemade Tick Kit

Why would you need an all-natural tick kit?

 

Well, if you’ve ever had Lyme disease, you know how miserable it can make you.

 

If you’ve never experienced it, believe me when I say you want to do everything to prevent it.

 

And if you’ve been bit by a tick recently, you want to rule it out right away. A tick kit will help with all of the above.

 

My Lyme Disease Story

I had a brush with Lyme disease about 12 years ago. At first, the doctor didn’t believe me – he decided it was a Staph infection because there wasn’t a traditional bullseye rash.

 

Newsflash: Not all deer tick bites develop the traditional bullseye rash.

 

I asked for antibiotics to treat Lyme disease anyway, as well as a test because I had the symptoms (excessive tiredness, flu-like symptoms, joint pain).

 

What followed was 14 days of miserable joint pain, fever, loss of appetite (from the antibiotics) and I felt really drained all the time.

 

In fact, the only thing I could eat was greek yogurt with peaches for about 2 weeks.

 

Now, we keep a tick kit on our farm, which helps us stay organized should someone get bit (or even find one on them).

 

The chickens do a pretty good job of keeping the tick population at bay, but realistically, they can’t get them all!

 

What should be in an all-natural tick kit?

Here’s what we keep in our tick kit (we keep one in the house and one in each car so I don’t have to remember to bring one with us).

 

 

I prefer to use small plastic containers like these for a tick kit because they stay cleaner and are less likely to break if jostled in our truck.

 

We also keep tick repellent in our truck and house to try and beat the ugly buggers to the punch. You can get more information about how to repel ticks naturally right here.

 

 

How do you remove a tick?

From the Center For Disease Control website, after grabbing your tick kit, you should:

 

  1. “Use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin’s surface as possible.
  2. Pull upward with steady, even pressure. Don’t twist or jerk the tick; this can cause the mouth-parts to break off and remain in the skin. If this happens, remove the mouth-parts with tweezers. If you are unable to remove the mouth easily with clean tweezers, leave it alone and let the skin heal.
  3. After removing the tick, thoroughly clean the bite area and your hands with rubbing alcohol, an iodine scrub, or soap and water.”
A tick kit can potentially save you a lot of heartache. Here's how to make one in 5 minutes with common household items!

Image via Wikimedia Commons

 

Another option we’ve used is to cleanse the area with rubbing alcohol mixed with an essential oil like lemon or oregano. (These are the exact oils we use).

 

If you’re allergic to rubbing alcohol, or have sensitive skin, you can use an essential-oil based soap and filtered water to cleanse the area.

 

A tick kit can potentially save you a lot of heartache. Here's how to make one in 5 minutes with common household items!

Image by Center For Disease Control via Wikimedia Commons

 

What next?

After removing the insect, tape it on a piece of paper you keep in your tick kit and write down the location of the bite and the date. Watch closely for symptoms of Lyme disease or other infection.

 

We also draw the boundaries of any redness, swelling, or rash with a Sharpie; if the skin gets red or irritated-looking outside of those boundaries, it’s evidence there is an infection of some sort, and it’s spreading.

 

As a precaution, we make a doctor visit for an opinion and if it seems at all like Lyme disease is present, we ask for antibiotics (I don’t mess around with Lymes since it has powerful long term effects

 

You can check the CDC website for common symptoms for all kind of tick-borne illnesses here. Print out a copy and keep it in your ll-natural tick kit for easy reference.

The Best All-Natural Bug Spray Using Essential Oils!

The Best All-Natural Bug Spray Using Essential Oils!

Bug season is upon us….and when you have as many animals as we do, you have a LOT of flies!

 

I used to buy store-bought bug sprays, but after many years working at the FDA, I know what’s in them…and there’s natural options I prefer to use, especially on my kids.

 

(A lot of you have asked about which oils I personally use. Here’s everything you need to know!)

 

So, I’m going to show you how to use essential oils to make a safe, non-toxic bug spray that’s worked for us. 

 

There’s a couple variations depending on the scents you like best. I personally prefer to go with Lemongrass but you can switch it out with Lavender or any other scent you like.

 

The only thing to remember is that if you want to use a citrus scent, the oils can make you more photo-sensitive. So just keep that in mind before you use them!

 

You CAN leave oils for scent out, but I’ve found that Eucalyptus can sometimes smell medicinal….so if you’re sensitive to those smells or your kids object, consider adding something like Lavender.

 

The Eucalyptus and Peppermint do a great job at deterring flies and no-see-ums. We have one horse that’s particularly sensitive to no-see-ums, and he seems much more comfortable after an application.

 

How to Make A Non-Toxic Bug Spray With Essential Oils

 

For an easy to make all natural, non-toxic bug spray here’s what you can use:

 

  • 10 drops Lemongrass or Lavender for scent
  • 10 drops Eucalyptus
  • 10 drops Peppermint

 

Slowly drip each oil into a 10mL roller bottle (this is the brand I buy) and top with a carrier oil such as fractionated coconut oil, almond oil, or avocado oil.

 

The roller bottle makes it super simple to apply to your body, and you can feel confident knowing that it’s totally safe for your kids.

 

Before going outside, simply roll the bug spray onto your neck, arms and legs.

 

This recipe also works as a spray for animals. You can mix it with 8 ounces of water and pour into a spray bottle. Just be sure to shake and mix before using for the best results.

 

You can spray it in your chicken coop to deter flies, however, I don’t recommend using it ON your chickens.

 

There you have it! A simple and easy bug spray you can make again and again in your own home!

 

(Ready to grab some essential oils so you can get bugs out of your life for good? Here’s everything you need to know!)

Natural Fly Repellent You Can Make In Your Kitchen (Really)

Natural Fly Repellent You Can Make In Your Kitchen (Really)

Tired of gross chemicals in your fly repellent? Me too. Want a natural alternative? Cool, I have one.

 

It’s a dilemma we have every summer – do we suffer the flies or load ourselves with questionable chemicals?

 

There was a time when we would use any fly repellent that worked – it didn’t matter what it contained, as long as the bugs were away.

 

So, I started researching alternatives to over-the-counter fly repellents, which included researching essential oils that might work, and I came up with some great information.

 

I just wanted a simple, straight forward way to make fly repellent whenever I needed it without waiting, and using all natural ingredients that I already had on hand.

 

After some research, I developed an all natural fly repellent using organic herbs, and I’m going to share the recipe with you.

 

My recipe for all natural fly repellent requires 4 ingredients: Lavender, peppermint, water, and witch hazel.

 

Just having the plants around, however, isn’t enough of a repellent – you need to release the essential oils in the plant to light a fire under its effectiveness. 

 

Luckily, that’s a pretty easy thing to do.

 

You can make this today, in your own kitchen, with just a few ingredients.

 

Want a natural alternative to chemical-filled bug sprays? Here's a recipe for natural fly repellent you can make in your own kitchen - today. From FrugalChicken

 

1. Choose your herbs

 

Lavender

For this recipe, I used peppermint and lavender. Both are grown organically here on the homestead, and are a natural addition to any herb garden.

 

Lavender is one of those power herbs you should have in your garden, and its been researched and proven to be a natural fly repellent on its own – I’m not sure why, but flies hate it.

 

Lavender also has the beneficial side effects of being a natural calming agent, and its great for skin – and in fact, whenever I use this natural fly repellent, my skin is softer.

 

 

Peppermint

The other herb I chose to formulate a natural fly repellent is peppermint. The strong scent is reported to get rid of even the most stubborn fly.

 

I sell it in my online store right here.

 

Want a natural alternative to chemical-filled bug sprays? Here's a recipe for natural fly repellent you can make in your own kitchen - today. From FrugalChicken

 

But it gets better:

 

Mosquitoes hate it too, making this another power herb you should have on hand to use as a natural repellent.

 

Peppermint is great to energize you, too.

 

I use stems containing the leaves, but it comes down to probably 3 or 4 tablespoons of herbs.

 

I don’t recommend dry herbs for this fly repellent – they don’t have the same level of essential oils as fresh herbs because they lack the moisture content.

 

2. Release the essential oils

 

If you’re using herbs, then the first step to creating your natural fly repellent is to release the essential oils in your herbs – they will be one of the active ingredients in your fly repellent.

 

This is a very basic way to create an essential oil mixture, and although it’s not the method used by essential oil companies, it will work well to create a natural fly repellent.

 

To release the herbs’ natural essential oils, you need to crush them slightly, then combine them with boiling water.

 

Want a natural alternative to chemical-filled bug sprays? Here's a recipe for natural fly repellent you can make in your own kitchen - today. From FrugalChicken

 

Bring 2 cups of water to a boil – not a rolling boil, however, so reduce the heat just before to gets to that point. 

 

Once it’s heated, add your herbs. 

 

3. Allow your herbs to steep while the mixture cools

 

 

To make the natural fly repellent effective, you need to release the oils in the herbs – let the herbs sit in the water until it’s cool. 

 

Yup, it’s like making tea, and it will smell great.

 

Be sure to cover the herb mixture to keep the released essential oils in the mixture – as they release in the steam, the top will encourage the natural oils to drop back down into the water.

 

This is important because you don’t want to lose the most effective part of your fly repellent.

 

4. Remove the herbs, and add in the witch hazel

 

Strain the herbs from the water – I strain it into a mason jar.

 

Want a natural alternative to chemical-filled bug sprays? Here's a recipe for natural fly repellent you can make in your own kitchen - today. From FrugalChicken

The herb mixture before adding in the witch hazel

 

Now is the time to mix in your witch hazel, which will act as a binder, and keep the scent of the herbs on your skin longer.

 

Since water is absorbed by the skin quickly, you need something, like witch hazel, that will sit on your skin longer than a few moments for the herbs to be effective in your fly repellent. 

 

Want a natural alternative to chemical-filled bug sprays? Here's a recipe for natural fly repellent you can make in your own kitchen - today. From FrugalChicken

 

For this formula, I use a 1:1 ratio, so since you’ll use 2 cups of water, add in 2 cups of witch hazel. Just dump it right into your mason jar.

 

If you don’t like the smell of witch hazel, you can use rubbing alcohol, which is just as effective in a natural fly repellent.

 

5. Stir to combine, and add your fly repellent to a spray bottle

 

Want a natural alternative to chemical-filled bug sprays? Here's a recipe for natural fly repellent you can make in your own kitchen - today. From FrugalChicken

 

Once everything is mixed together, you have your natural fly repellent. Just pour it into a spray bottle, and it’s ready to use immediately.

 

Spray it on yourself before heading outside – it’s safe for children too, since the herbs’ natural oils have been diluted in the water and witch hazel.

 

Oh, yeah, and it doesn’t contain any chemicals, which is great for kids too.

 

6. Some notes:

 

If you don’t like the smell of the witch hazel, you can use rubbing alcohol instead. 

 

You can use citronella as well as peppermint and lavender. I’ve used it as well, but left it out of this recipe since not everyone has it growing in their garden. You can purchase citronella essential oils to use in your fly repellent, and it works great.

 

If you want to get citronella essential oil, by clicking here.

 

 

While no fly repellent is 100% effective against bugs, going all natural is a great choice if you’re looking for an effective alternative to chemical-based products.