What To Buy At The Farmer’s Market This Month: September

What To Buy At The Farmer’s Market This Month: September

It’s fall y’all! I LOVE fall especially at the farmer’s market!

I know all anyone can think about this month is pumpkin spice, but I’m over here dreaming about the yummy fruits and vegetables I’ll be able to buy at the farmer’s market in September.

In my area farmer’s markets are in full swing in September and all of the farmers start pulling out all the stops to satisfy everyone’s pumpkin spice and apple cinnamon needs.

I love the farmers market! But I’ve learned over the years that not everyone can navigate the farmer’s market as easily as others. Personally I think that shopping at the farmer’s market is a great experience as long as you go into it with the right expectations. Here are a few things to know before you head out to your local farmers market.

  1. Your food will not look perfect!

Many of us are used to the picture perfect produce we see at the grocery store. But most of the time the produce you pick up from the farmers market is not going to look perfect, and that’s ok!

2. You won’t find out of season produce.

When you shop at the farmer’s market you have to get used to eating seasonally. So if you live somewhere with cold winters, you’re probably not going to find fresh corn in January. But the great thing about eating seasonally is that it allows you to try out produce you haven’t tried before that’s available locally in your area!

3. You food will taste amazing!

Produce from the farmer’s market are typically picked when they are ripe because they don’t have to be shipped long distances. Because of this your food will taste amazing because it was picked at peak ripeness! Plus it’s fresher than produce you get from the grocery store, so it will taste so much better!

I could keep raving about farmer’s market products all day, but let’s get started. Keep in mind that this is a general guide and it could vary based on where you live. If you want to know exactly what to look for at the farmer’s market in your area check out this website called The Seasonal Food Guide!

So here are some products you should be looking for at your local farmer’s market in September!

Chives

I love chives because they are such a good garnish for food! They add a super yummy flavor to any meal! I am so excited to get some fresh chives so that I can try out this recipe for Chive Biscuits!

Tomatillos

Ok so I’ll admit to being obsessed with salsa. I just can’t stop myself from eating it! And tomatillos make the best salsa! This recipe is for a classic salsa verde made with tomatillos!

Sweet Potatoes

I’ve actually grown to love using sweet potatoes in my meals. I used to think sweet potatoes were disgusting, but now I’m really loving using sweet potatoes in soups like this one. Make sure you pick up some sweet potatoes at the farmer’s market this month!

Onions

Onions are in season in September! I love having fresh onions, but they make my eyes water like crazy! It’s worth it though for the delicious flavor it adds to all of my meals! Growing up we had onions and garlic in EVERYTHING, so it’s definitely a cooking staple for me!

Garlic

Personally, I love to store fresh garlic that I get from the farmer’s market, so that I can eat it all year long! You can read my post about How To Store Garlic Long Term here!

how to store garlic long term #garlic

Endive

I’ve never had endive before, but I’ll definitely be looking for it in September at the farmer’s market so that I can try it out! I’m super excited to try this recipe for goat cheese stuffed endive!

Celery

Celery is a classic snack for your kids and I love eating it too! It’s especially good when you get it from the local farmer’s market! Check out my favorite healthy snacks for kids for my favorite ways to make healthy eating fun (and delicious) for your kids!

Brussels Sprouts

I am not a fan of brussels sprouts. But I know there are some people who love them (y’all are crazy because they’re nasty!). If you’re a brussels sprout lover look for some at your local farmer’s market in September!

Grapes

Grapes are also an amazing healthy snack! Locally grown grapes are AMAZING, so see if you can pick some up at your local farmer’s market.

Radicchio

I have never tried radicchio before, but I’m so excited to find it at the farmer’s market! I love trying out new fruits and vegetables especially when I have fun, new recipes to try out like this one for radicchio risotto!

Winter Squash

There are all kinds of varieties of winter squash that I find in my area starting in September. Spaghetti, acorn, and butternut squash seem to be the most popular around here, but keep an eye out for different kinds! And don’t forget pumpkins are a winter squash too! Check out this yummy recipe for pumpkin bread!

 

Potatoes

I eat a lot of potatoes, especially if they’re fresh potatoes!!! I eat mashed potatoes almost every week and I love to make these southern style mashed potatoes you make in your instant pot!

Apples

I’ve said it before, but I love fresh apples! I always end up grabbing tons of apples when I go to the farmer’s market in September!

Apple Cider

Since I love apples so much, I’m always on the hunt for some good apple cider. In my area there is an amazing local company that makes AWESOME apple cider from their freshly grown apples. It’s not cheap (I’ve seen it as high as $8 a gallon) but I’m obsessed with it. I highly recommend that you look for local apple cider producers in September! It’s the perfect fall drink and it’s even better if it’s bought locally!

What products are you excited to find at the farmer’s market this month? I’d love to hear about it in the comments below!

Want Gourmet Ingredients Right At Your Fingertips? Grow These 10 Easy But Oh-So-Delicious Herbs!

Want Gourmet Ingredients Right At Your Fingertips? Grow These 10 Easy But Oh-So-Delicious Herbs!

Have you ever moved to a new home and realized you didn’t quite know what you were getting into?

 

That’s what happened when we moved to our farm. We were very used to easy sources for herbs, creme fraiche, and other yummy ingredients.

 

(Want more great down-home gardening advice? Grab your copy of my new book Organic By Choice: The (Secret) Rebel’s Guide To Backyard Gardening available now on Amazon!)

 

Buuuuttt…good luck finding them in a 50 mile radius in this rural town.

 

In fact, part of the reason we started our homestead was so we could have access to fresh, organic ingredients that otherwise we would have zero access to (or at least ingredients that hadn’t been sprayed with a ton of Round-up or shipped from questionable sources overseas) – herbs included.

 

If you’ve found yourself in a similar situation, or just want to bring the garden indoors, here’s 10 easy, versatile, and gourmet herbs we’ve had success with!

 

You can grow them in your own kitchen, and they’ll have your friends convinced you’re either a green-thumb savant and/or Gordon Ramsay himself.

 

Enjoy!

 

Basil (Ocimum basilicum)

You can grow basil as an annual herb. For classic and aromatic flavor; you can try Genovese Basil. Grow Lemon Basil for a citrus flavor and Spicy Globe if you’ll like a Basil herb that grows compactly (8 to 10 inches tall). Spicy Globe basil looks great in pots. Plant in at least a 6-inch pot, keep watered, and fertilize with compost once a month. Ready to harvest when the plant is 6-inches tall, well established, and consistently growing leaves. Easy pesto anyone?

 

Bay (Laurus nobilis)

Although this initially grows very slowly, with enough patience, it will eventually form a bush or small tree which you can easily train into a wide array of shapes, or even a topiary. To make it easy start, you can purchase a young, organic, 1- to 2-foot plant and begin nurturing it. Perfect for soups and stews.

 

Chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium)

Also known as French parsley, this annual herb shares a striking similarity to delicate overtones of anise in terms of appearance and taste. Water regularly, and feed compost every other month. To harvest Chervil, all you need to do is snip the outer leaves and stems.

 

Chives (Allium schoenoprasum)

This is a grass-like herb with a mild onion flavor. Perfect on baked potatoes, or whenever you need a delicate, fresh, onion flavor. When harvesting, it is highly important to cut small bunches of leaves back into the soil level in order to keep new ones growing constantly.

 

Cilantro (Coriandrum sativum)

Plant in a deep pot because Cilantro has a long taproot, and needs room to grow. It’s best to plant is where you intend to keep it because it doesn’t do well with transplanting. Keep in a sunny area since it loves warmth, and water regularly.

 

Dill (Anethum graveolens)

Dill is an aromatic annual herb which is best known for its leaves when it is grown indoors. You can also grow it for its seeds – if you’re able to stop yourself from eating it! Add to soups and curries, or with fish. Fernleaf dill is a compact herb which is perfect for indoor growth.

 

Marjoram (Origanum spp.)

This herb originates from the Mediterranean and it is a member of the oregano family. However it stands out from other members of its botanical family in terms of flavor, which is distinctly sweeter and more delicate. Sweet marjoram can be grown in pots on a sunny kitchen window sill. Plant in a 6-inch pot, and water regularly.

 

Mints (Mentha spp.)

Peppermint and spearmint are both awesome choices for your kitchen. You can harvest it for tea or as flavoring in a salad. It’s hardy and easy to grow as long as it gets water regularly (if the soil is dry below the surface, it’s time to water.) If growing outdoors, you should ensure to put mint in its own personal container as it can easily outgrow and choke other herbs. When the plant is young but established, snip off new growth to encourage the plant to spread and develop more stems.

 

Oregano (Origanum vulgare ssp. hirtum)

There’s a few different types of oregano. For one that packs a lot of flavor, Greek oregano can grow up to about 12 inches in pots (plant in a 6 to 8-inch pot for best results). Ensure to harvest oregano leaves regularly in order to encourage the growth of new ones.

 

 

Parsley (Petroselinum spp.)

Both Italian flat-leaf and curly-leaf parsley grow effectively when put indoors. When harvesting, ensure that you cut off the outer leaves. Doing this will spur the growth of new leaves from its center and will keep it productive for a long period of time, possibly several months.

 

I’d like to hear from you!

Do you have a favorite herb to grow in your kitchen? Leave a comment below!