Thinking about freezing chicken eggs because you’re getting so many? Read on for my best tips!

 

Eggs are incredibly valuable: within them lie the blueprints of life. But they’re also sustenance. The vast amount of cultures that raise chickens across the world has made their eggs one of – if not the – most important egg on the planet. 

MY LATEST VIDEOS

 

While most of us want to eat eggs as soon as possible, often, we’re left with WAY too many of them!

 

While you have many options for preserving eggs, freezing is the easiest and one of the safest ways to make sure you have “butt nuggets” on hand whenever you want them. (This goes for chicken eggs and duck eggs).

 

Then, when it is time to use them, they can be thawed for any and all of our culinary dreams. This is truly a wonderful fact that can add some versatility to this egg-cellent ingredient. 

 

However, if we are going to freeze eggs, there are some key details to consider first.

can you freeze eggs in shells

How quickly should you freeze eggs?

If you are going to freeze your eggs, it is better to do so sooner than later. A few days at room temperature or in the fridge is about the maximum length of time you should wait before freezing them (learn how to tell if eggs are fresh here). That way, you are using only the freshest eggs you can put into your freezer. As eggs should only be frozen for about a year before they are used, dating your storage containers is recommended. 

 

No Shells Allowed!

As anyone who accidentally leaves eggs in their coop during a snowstorm can attest, eggs expand as they freeze, which can (and probably will) result in enough pressure on their shells to break them. As a result, eggs should never be frozen in shells. Cracking them into a container also ensures that you’re not using valuable space to store any eggs that might have problems: veins, lash eggs (yuck!), partially-incubated chickens (yes, it can happen), or other egg abnormalities. You’ll also want to wash your eggs first – you don’t want flecks of dirt, bacteria, or manure to get into your whites or yolk prior to freezing.

 

Should you separate yolks and egg whites?

When people ask “can you freeze eggs,” they next ask whether they should freeze the WHOLE egg, or  separate whites and yolk. 

 

It’s a good question, because the yolk and albumen are very difficult to separate once they have already been frozen. If you only plan using eggs for dinner – in stir-fry, breakfast cooking styles, salads, or in meat recipes – then cracking them straight into your storage receptacle is ideal.

 

If you plan to bake or do any cooking that requires just yolk or egg white, then separating white from yolk would be the better option. (Here’s a ton of recipes that use eggs!)

 

Either way is fine, but if you plan to store your eggs whole, then consider beating them just past the blending point. Doing this prevents the yolks from taking on a gelatinous consistency, which can be very difficult to cook with.

 

How to store just egg whites

Whites are relatively easy to store. Break the egg, and separate out the yolk, being careful to avoid getting any yolk in them. Then pour the whites into your receptacle of choice, and freeze. The best containers for whites are ice cube trays or in large freezer bags. Label them with the date of storage and quantity of eggs.

 

How to freeze the yolk

Yolks are trickier, because the freezing process causes them to thicken or gel. Once gelled, their usage diminishes significantly, and while it might be possible to find a use for them, the uses of gelled yolks are quite few and far between.

 

For every 4 yolks, you should beat in either 1/8 teaspoon salt or 1.5 teaspoons sugar. Be sure to label the bag with when they were frozen and whether they have been beaten with sugar or salt. Pulling out sweetened yolks for a main dish, or salted yolks for a dessert isn’t the best idea!

 

Ready, Set, Cook!

When you are ready to use your frozen eggs, thaw them overnight in the refrigerator or under running cool or cold water. Then, as soon as they are thawed, put them to use.

 

So, can you freeze eggs? The answer is YES! Go for it!

Summary
Article Name
Can You Freeze Eggs?
Description
Wondering "can you freeze eggs?" Here's how to safely freeze eggs so you can use them in any recipe later and how to freeze just the egg whites and yolks!
Author