12 Chickens That Lay Colored Eggs: Blue, Green, Chocolate, and Pink!

12 Chickens That Lay Colored Eggs: Blue, Green, Chocolate, and Pink!

Every backyard flock owner dreams of raising chickens that lay colored eggs. Who doesn’t want a paint box of vibrant colors in your morning basket?

 

But first, you need hens that lay colored eggs – so you gotta know which breeds LAY colored eggs!

 

In this article, you’ll discover which chicken breeds lay:

  • Blue eggs
  • Green eggs
  • Dark brown eggs
  • Pink Eggs

 

We’ll also share where you can buy these types of chickens!

 

Chickens That Lay Blue Eggs

What Breed Of Chickens Lay Blue Eggs?

  • Araucana
  • Ameraucana
  • Cream Legbar
  • Easter Egger
  • Arkansas Blue

 

Did you know all eggs are either blue or white? You can read more about different colored eggs here

 

Araucana

This ancient breed is named after the Araucania region of Chile – where scientists say they evolved. Araucana chickens lay blue eggs and have an appearance unlike most other chickens – they grow tufts of feathers near their ears, called “peduncles.”

 

Araucanas also are “rumpless” (meaning they don’t have tails), so don’t expect your roosters to grow any long tail feathers.

 

Many people confuse Araucanas with Ameraucanas and Easter Eggers. They can look similar, but they’re different breeds with different egg laying abilities. You can read more about the difference between Ameraucana and Araucanas here:

 

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So if you want this type of chicken in your flock, go to a reliable breeder.

 

The hens lay about 200 beautiful blue eggs every year. You can learn more about Araucana chickens here.

 

Ameraucana

Wondering “what color eggs do ameraucana chickens lay?” Well, they’re blue! Ameraucanas were created by American researchers, who used Araucana bloodlines, but eliminated a lethal gene that kills a portion of chicks before they hatched. (Ameraucana is a conglomeration of the words “American” and “Araucana.”)

 

Like their Araucana foremothers, this breed lays blue eggs. They have a distinctive appearance with tufts of feathers, muffs, and a “beard” of feathers that makes their chicks look like balls of fluff. They also have a pea comb.

Ameraucana hens lay about 200 blue eggs a year, and they can be a light sky blue to almost green.

 

You can read more about Ameraucanas here.

 

Cream Legbar

Cream Legbars are a relatively new 20th century chicken breed that was created by researchers at Cambridge University. These scientists crossed Leghorns, Barred Plymouth Rocks, and Cambars with Araucanas to create a second type of blue egg layer that also eliminated the lethal Araucana gene.

 

These chickens have cream-colored feathers (hence the name Cream Legbar). They also look different from Ameraucanas, Araucanas, and Easter Eggers.

 

Cream Legbars hens lay about 200 blue or bluish green eggs annually.

 

Arkansas Blue

This is a relatively unknown breed that’s been developed by researchers in Arkansas. They’re not for sale currently. They don’t have muffs, tufts, or beards, however, they do have a pea comb and lay blue eggs.

 

Easter Egger

Many new backyard chicken owners have heard of Easter Eggers! They’re a very popular breed because they lay different colored eggs.

 

These hens lay about 250 eggs per year, and some do lay blue eggs. Unlike the chicken breeds previously mentioned, not all Easter Eggers will lay blue eggs.

 

In fact, this type of chicken is a hybrid – a cross between a blue egg layer (like Ameraucana) and a brown egg layer (like a Plymouth rock). An Easter Egger chicken can lay blue, green, brown, or pink eggs!

 

Each chicken only lays one color egg though. If you want blue eggs, it’s best to stick with Ameraucana, Araucanas, or Cream Legbars.

 

You can read more about Easter Eggers here.

 

What Chicken Lays The Bluest Eggs?

Araucana eggs are the bluest eggs known, and are caused by the oocyan gene. This breed evolved in Chile, and all other blue egg laying breeds are descended from Araucanas. The blue egg gene is a mutation caused by a retrovirus.

 

Chickens That Lay Green Eggs

What Breed Of Chickens Lay Green Eggs?

  • Easter Eggers
  • Olive Eggers
  • Isbars
  • Ice Cream Bars
  • Favaucanas

 

Easter Egger

As previously mentioned Easter Eggers can lay green colored eggs – however, it’s not guaranteed. The color of the eggs will depend on the genetics of the individual chicken. So, if you definitely want green eggs, then check out the breeds below.

 

Olive Egger

What chickens lay olive green eggs? Like other types of chickens mentioned on this list, Olive Eggers aren’t a true breed – they’re hybrids. BUT they lay great dark green eggs!

 

They’re a cross between a blue egg layer and a dark brown egg layer, and their eggs can range from dark green to a brownish green egg. One breed combination that makes an olive egger chicken is an Ameraucana hen and a Marans rooster.

 

The amount of eggs olive eggers lay depends on the individual bird (since they’re a hybrid) but you can usually expect about 200 eggs per year.

 

Isbar

Isbar (pronounced “ice bar”) is a Swedish breed developed in the mid-20th century by Martin Silverudd, who wanted to create an autosexing chicken breed that consistently laid colored eggs. (Autosexing means you can tell the sex of a chick as soon as it hatches).

 

This breed lays about 200 green colored eggs each year. You can buy Isbars at Greenfire Farms, among other breeders.

 

Ice Cream Bars

Ice Cream Bars are a cross between Isbars and Cream Legbars – and they lay green eggs! Many owners say their eggs are colored teal or blueish green – so it seems the actual shade depends on the individual hen.

 

Favaucana

Like the other chickens on this list, Favaucanas are a hybrid chicken (which isn’t bad – usually hybrids are healthier and friendly). They’re a breed sold on My Pet Chicken, and is created by crossing Favorelles with Amerauanas. They lay “sage green” eggs, and are said to have friendly personalities.

 

Chickens That Lay Dark Brown (Chocolate Eggs)

  • Barnvelder
  • Welsummer
  • Marans

Barnvelder

Barnvelders originate from the Barneveld region of Holland. They were developed about 200 years ago by crossing local Dutch chickens with breeds imported from Asia such as Cochins or Brahmas.

 

Barnevelders are beautiful birds – the hens display a black-and-white or buff-and-white “double laced” feathering, giving them a distinctive appearance. Roosters have blue and green tinged double lacing, with a single comb. They were included in the American Standard of Perfection in 1991.

 

Some unrecognized varieties are auto-sexing (meaning, you can tell the sex of the chick when it’s born). These types include:

  • Barred
  • Dark brown
  • Partridge
  • Chamois
  • Blue
  • Silver

 

Welsummer

Welsummers are intelligent and docile chickens that add nice, chocolate-brown eggs to any backyard flock. Like their name implies, they originated in Holland. They love to forage, and you can expect up to 200 eggs per year. You can buy Welsummers at any major hatchery.

 

Marans

Originating in the town of Marans, France, Marans eggs (particularly Black Copper Marans) are noted as the best in the world – in fact, some chefs will ONLY cook with Marans eggs!

 

While historically a dual purpose breed, many people now raise these chickens for its striking egg color and beautiful appearance.

 

Maran eggs are traditionally a deep chocolate brown color, although the exact color will depend on the individual bird. You can usually tell how dark a hen’s eggs will be after she lays 12 eggs (the first 12 might be darker than the remaining eggs she lays.)

 

What Breed Of Chickens Lay Pink Eggs?

Easter Egger eggs can sometimes be pink. However, this hybrid breed can also lay eggs of varying colors that range from blue, green, or brown. Take note that a hen will only lay one color of egg.

 

Easter Eggers are great for beginners because they lay consistently (about 250 eggs per year) – There is no standard for this chicken breed, and one chicken can look quite different from another.

 

Can A Chicken Lay Different Colored Eggs?

No, a hen will only produce one color of egg, and the tint of her eggshells is determined by her genetics. Unlike yolks, you cannot change the color of her eggs based on diet. That being said, if the hen is stressed, she might lay lighter eggs or weird looking eggshells. However, some breeds, like Easter Eggers, will produce hens that can each lay a different color egg (so one hen will lay blue eggs, one will lay green, etc).

 

Why Are My Chickens Eggs Getting Lighter In Color?

A decrease in pigmentation in the eggshell can be caused by a poor diet, stress, or age. Stress such as predators or heat stress can cause a lightening of the eggshell. Make sure your hens have plenty of protein and fresh water. To make sure her diet is right, feed your hen a good layer feed with 16% protein.

 

Do Different Color Eggs Taste Different?

No, eggs with different colors doesn’t taste any different than a regular white egg. The taste of an egg depends on the quality of the hen’s diet, not the color of the eggshell. You can read more about what to feed chickens for great tasting eggs here, what chickens eat here, and about alternative feeds for chickens here. For golden egg yolks, offer your flock herbs.

 

How Do You Tell What Color Egg A Chicken Will Lay?

You can tell by the breed of a chicken – Plymouth rock will lay brown eggs, for example. You can also look at the earlobes, although this isn’t much help determining the egg color of Easter Eggers or chickens when you don’t know the breed (some can lay brown eggs, some olive eggs, etc). Traditionally, hens with white earlobes will lay white eggs while hens with red earlobes will lay brown eggs. The exception is Silkies, which have blue earlobes, but lay white eggs.

 

Do Chicken Ears Determine Egg Color?

Chicken earlobes can be a determinant of their egg color. Traditionally, hens with white earlobes will lay white eggs while hens with red earlobes will lay brown eggs. However, in practice, this isn’t a good indicator because Silkies have blue earlobes, but lay white eggs, while blue or green egg laying chickens have red earlobes.

 

How Many Different Color Eggs Do Chickens Lay?

A chicken will lay only one color of eggs. Some breeds, like Easter Eggers, will have hens who lay different colored eggs, but each individual hen will only lay a single egg color her whole life (so, one hen will lay blue eggs, another will lay green eggs, etc).

 

What Chicken Lays Purple Eggs?

No chickens lay colored eggs that are a true purple. Eggs have a protective layer on their outside called “the bloom,” which helps eggs stay fresh and bacteria free. Some hens will lay brown eggs with a heavy bloom that can tint the egg purple. However, when the bloom is washed off, the egg will be brown.

 

Does The Rooster Determine Egg Color?

No – both parents determine egg color. That’s why hybrid breeds – like Olive Eggers – can exist. One parent has a blue egg laying gene while the other has a dark brown egg laying gene. So, chickens that lay colored eggs have genes from both parents that influence shell color. You can read more about how roosters influence laying here.

 

Which chickens that lay colored eggs do you raise? Leave a comment below!

How Different Colored Eggs Are Formed (And Why All Eggs Are Either White Or Blue)

How Different Colored Eggs Are Formed (And Why All Eggs Are Either White Or Blue)

Do you want different colored eggs in your morning egg basket? Who doesn’t?

I have often been emailed by people asking: “Why are chicken eggs different colors?” So let’s talk about different chicken egg colors.

 

Harvesting different colored eggs is one of the best parts of chicken ownership, and I personally keep certain breeds, such as Easter Eggers and Blue Copper Marans, on our homestead just so I can harvest different colored eggs.

 

It’s wonderfully exciting to check the coop only to find a blue, green, pink, or dark brown egg in the hens’ favorite nest (because they all have to pile into the same nesting box!).

 

In fact, I love gathering different colored eggs so much that the only egg color we don’t have on the homestead is white!


Have you ever wondered why chicken eggs come in different colors?

 

Well, I have an answer for you!

 

Curious about how different colored eggs are made? Do you know why all eggs are either truly white or blue? In this article, you'll learn how chickens make different colored eggs, how their color is determined, and why every egg out there is either blue or white. From FrugalChicken.

 

While most eggs start off as white as the yolk is encased in a shell and travels down the oviduct, according to the University of Kentucky, their final color is based on the chicken’s genetics.

 

In most cases, only once the egg hits the uterus does it actually become colored.

 

Except…

 

Unless your hen is an Ameraucana, Araucana, or an Easter Egger that lays blue eggs.

 

Why’s that?

 

These two breeds use the pigment oocyanin to color their egg shells blue, and as the pigment is deposited on the egg as it travels through the oviduct, it permeates the egg.

 

Unlike other pigments, oocyanin covers eggs earlier in the shell-making process. This results in the interior and exterior of the egg being the same blue color, the University of Michigan found.

 

With olive eggers and Easter Eggers that lay different colored eggs, a brown pigment called protoporphyrin overlays a blue shell, which results in a green egg, and a blue interior egg shell.

 

So what about the rest of the chicken breeds that lay different colored eggs?

 

Their interiors are white, and that’s because chickens that lay brown tinted eggs deposit the protoporphyrin on the eggs much later in the shell forming process than oocyanin.

Curious about how different colored eggs are made? Do you know why all eggs are either truly white or blue? In this article, you'll learn how chickens make different colored eggs, how their color is determined, and why every egg out there is either blue or white. From FrugalChicken.

 

Because of this, protoporphyrin does not penetrate the interior of the egg, but colors only the surface of the egg, leaving the interior white.

 

The breed of your chicken will determine how her eggs are colored, whether they are brown, white, green, etc., but her individual genetics will determine the exact shade.

 

In case you don’t know, chickens, like humans, are born with millions of eggs in her ovaries, but she will only lay a fraction of those eggs in her lifetime.

 

After the egg is released, which is a hormonal response, it takes 26 hours to actually be laid, and during that time, it goes on a journey through her oviduct. Most of that time is spent forming the egg shell.

 

Only in the last few hours before the egg is laid does the pigment get added, creating the different colored eggs we find in our coops.

 

Pretty exciting stuff, don’t you think?

 

So…

Which chicken breeds lay different colored eggs?

 

While there’s a lot of chicken breeds that will lay different colored eggs, a short list of the most colorful eggs include:

 

  • Marans for dark chocolate colored 
  • Easter Eggers for green, blue, or pink 
  • Olive Eggers (a cross between a brown layer and a blue layer) for dark green 
  • Araucanas for blue 
  • Ameraucanas for blue (although Ameraucana and Araucana are referred to interchangeably, a true Araucana is a descendent of the chickens imported Chile to America in the 1920s).
Curious about how different colored eggs are made? Do you know why all eggs are either truly white or blue? In this article, you'll learn how chickens make different colored eggs, how their color is determined, and why every egg out there is either blue or white. From FrugalChicken.

“Araucana hen showing ear tufts” by User:Anne Cushing – Own work. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

What about eggs that are speckled or with different shades?

 

While these eggs are usually completely normal, they can also be abnormal chicken eggs, and an indication something is not right with your hen.

 

Sometimes her diet can be off, or she might be experiencing some sort of stress like heat stress.

 

Speckles usually are normal, and are a welcome, and often beautiful, change!

Curious about how to tell if your chickens will lay different colored eggs other than white?

 

An interesting tip is to look at the chicken’s ear lobes.

 

Typically a chicken with white ear lobes will produce white eggs, while those with red earlobes will produce brown or different colored eggs.

 

Do the different colors impact the flavor or the health value of the eggs?

 

In short, nope.

 

Believe it or not, this is a common question I get from people unfamiliar with chickens.

 

A study by the University of Kansas showed that although brown eggs are more popular in grocery stores because they’re perceived as healthier, in fact the different colors in an egg has nothing to do with how healthy they are.

 

Different colored eggs and white ones have the exact same amount of cholesterol in them.

 

So eat away at those different colored eggs and don’t worry about whether they’re more or less nutritious for you (your hen’s diet actually determines how healthy her eggs are for you.)

Curious about how different colored eggs are made? Do you know why all eggs are either truly white or blue? In this article, you'll learn how chickens make different colored eggs, how their color is determined, and why every egg out there is either blue or white. From FrugalChicken.

I’d like to hear from you!

 

Which different colored eggs are your favorite? Which chicken breeds do you keep for colored eggs (I personally love Easter egger egg colors)? Email me at [email protected] or comment below!

More Egg Articles:


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